Birth by Design: Pregnancy, Maternity Care, and Midwifery in North America and Europe

By Raymond Devries; Sirpa Wrede et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction to Part III

Cecilia Benoit

Part I approached the study of birth from the macro level, discussing the role of the state and a collection of other groups involved in designing maternal health services. Part II focused the social scientific eye on the meso level, analyzing the complex nature of professional group formation and competition within maternal health systems. The third and final part of the book takes the reader to the micro level, shedding light on two central themes: (1) the views of maternity clients on their access to and utilization of maternal health services and (2) the varied ways technology shapes the work of midwives and the experiences of birthing women.

The authors of Part III address the following questions: In what ways are intranational differences in women’s experiences of maternity care policy marked by culture and history? How do women come to internalize, and act on, different notions of “risk” in childbirth? What role does technology play in “training” women’s bodies for birth? What do women really want in the provision of maternity care?

Taken collectively, the four chapters in this final part of the book argue that society and culture shape birthing women’s desires about what they want and the maternity care they receive. Evidence offered here also suggests significant variation in the use of obstetrical technologies in different societal settings.

The first chapter of Part III, Chapter 10, presents a fascinating study of how vestiges of the former East and West Germany influence attitudes about, and the use of, prenatal diagnostic technology. Erikson shows that policies in and of themselves do not dictate women’s experiences of maternity care. The nearly parallel development of maternity care policies in East and West Germany had very varying impacts on the women (and men) living in these two nation-states, due in large measure to the value placed on women’s work.

Chapter 11 focuses on the convergence of three topics that run throughout the maternity care literature: risk, technology, and medical malpractice litigation. Cartwright and Thomas examine the concept of “risk” within obstetrics, using the anthropological understanding of risk as an idea that is culturally constituted and reflective of particular social institutions in a particular historical and political

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Birth by Design: Pregnancy, Maternity Care, and Midwifery in North America and Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Introduction: Why Maternity Care is Not Medical Care xi
  • Part I: - The Politics of Maternity Care 1
  • Introduction to Part I 3
  • Part II - Providing Care 113
  • Introduction to Part II 115
  • Part III - Society, Technology, and Practice 199
  • Introduction to Part III 201
  • Appendix 267
  • Contributors 280
  • Index 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.