A Political Chronology of Central, South and East Asia

By Ian Preston | Go to book overview

China (Taiwan)

c.3000 BC: The island of Taiwan was inhabited by tribes of Malayan and Polynesian origin who settled in the low-lying coastal plains; they named the island Pakan.

8th century AD: In mainland China the island of Taiwan was perceived as a savage and uncivilized place.

13th century: The Chinese began to engage in trade with Taiwan.

14th century: The first small Chinese settlements were established in Taiwan.

16th century: Chinese settlers from the provinces of Guangdong and Fujian arrived in Taiwan.

1544: The Portuguese arrived in Taiwan and named it Ilha Formosa (‘beautiful island’).

1626: The Spanish arrived in Taiwan and settled in the northern part of the island, setting up bases on the future sites of the towns of Chi-lung and Tan-shui.

1653: Following an unsuccessful rebellion by Chinese immigrants, the Dutch constructed Fort Provintia on the future site of Tainan.

1661: After his defeat in China by the Manzu tribes, the Chinese Ming loyalist Zheng Zheng Gong (Coxinga) drove the Dutch out of Taiwan and established an independent kingdom which lasted for 22 years.

1683: The Qing (Manzu) Emperor, Kang Xi, invaded and conquered Taiwan. During Qing rule immigration from mainland China established the ethnic Chinese character of the island.

August 1884: The French invaded northern Taiwan.

March 1885: The French occupied the P’enghu (Pescadores) islands, but withdrew a few months later.

17 April 1895: At the end of the Sino-Japanese War (1894-95), the Treaty of Shimonoseki was signed, by which China ceded Taiwan to the Japanese. Under Japanese rule Taiwan’s economic infrastructure was modernized.

25 May 1895: The Taiwanese Democratic Republic, the first republic in Asia, was established in resistance to Japanese rule, but lasted for only a few months.

30 May 1902: The and-Japanese leader Lim Siau-niau and his followers were killed whilst defending their stronghold near Kaohsiung, marking the end of open military resistance to Japanese rule in Taiwan.

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Political Chronology of Central, South and East Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Afghanistan 1
  • Bangladesh 15
  • Bhutan 30
  • The People’s Republic of China 35
  • China (taiwan) 87
  • India 104
  • Japan 135
  • Kazakhstan 158
  • The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (north Korea) 166
  • The Republic of Korea (south Korea) 180
  • Kyrgyzstan 205
  • The Maldives 213
  • Mongolia 217
  • Nepal 226
  • Pakistan 239
  • Sri Lanka 264
  • Tajikistan 286
  • Turkmenistan 295
  • Uzbekistan 302
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.