A Political Chronology of Central, South and East Asia

By Ian Preston | Go to book overview

Nepal

800 BC-AD 300: The Kirat kings ruled the Kathmandu valley.

c.563 BC: Gautama Siddhartha (the Buddha—‘enlightened one’) is widely believed to have been born in the small town of Lumbini near the Indian border. He founded Buddhism, one of the major religious and philosophical systems in Asia.

4th-5th centuries AD: The kingdom of Nepal was founded by the Licchavi dynasty.

602: Amsuverma Thakuri married Shivadeva, the daughter of the Licchavi King and founded the Thakuri dynasty.

879: The date of the first recorded use of the word Nepal, meaning ‘the beginning of a new era’, to describe the country.

10th-18th centuries: The Nepal valley was ruled by the Malla dynasty, who introduced Hinduism and established contact with China and India.

1303: The Gurkhas, a warlike tribe, were expelled from India by Sultan Ala-ud-din and fled into the hills of central Nepal.

c.1382-1395: Jaya Sthiti reigned; he established a legal code for Nepal based on Hindu principles.

c.1429-1482: The ruler Yaksa Malla divided the kingdom into three principalities—Kathmandu, Patan and Bhaktpur—for his sons.

1744: Prithvinarayan Shah, the ruler of Ghurka, conquered the adjacent kingdom of Nuwakot.

1756: Gurkha forces occupied the Kuti Pass and prevented trade between the Kathmandu valley and Tibet.

1767: The Nepal valley was conquered by the Gurkha ruler, Prithvi Narayan Shah.

1767: King Jaya Prakash Malla of Kathmandu enlisted British military assistance to combat Gurkha advances. Jaya Malla’s army was defeated at the battle of Sindhuli.

25 September 1768: The Gurkhas captured the city of Kathmandu and Prithvinarayan Shah proclaimed himself King of the united kingdoms of Nepal.

1769: The capital of the kingdom was established at Kathmandu.

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A Political Chronology of Central, South and East Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Afghanistan 1
  • Bangladesh 15
  • Bhutan 30
  • The People’s Republic of China 35
  • China (taiwan) 87
  • India 104
  • Japan 135
  • Kazakhstan 158
  • The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (north Korea) 166
  • The Republic of Korea (south Korea) 180
  • Kyrgyzstan 205
  • The Maldives 213
  • Mongolia 217
  • Nepal 226
  • Pakistan 239
  • Sri Lanka 264
  • Tajikistan 286
  • Turkmenistan 295
  • Uzbekistan 302
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