A Political Chronology of Central, South and East Asia

By Ian Preston | Go to book overview

Pakistan

327 BC: Alexander II (‘the Great’) of Macedon invaded the Punjab as far as the Beas River but, threatened with mutiny by his army, he returned to Persia.

1st century AD: The Mauryan Empire, which ruled the northern provinces of the Indian subcontinent, was invaded by the Central Asian chief Kujula Kadphises of the Yüeh-chih tribe, who established the Kushan Empire, with its capital Purushapura, near Peshawar.

3rd-7th centuries: The province of Sindh was ruled by the Persian Sassanid shahs.

330-380: Samudra Gupta, a regional ruler in what is now north-east India, conquered large areas of the Indian subcontinent including the north-west, laying foundations for the Gupta Empire.

500: The Hephthalites (‘White Huns’) invaded the northern provinces of the Gupta Empire, although the invasion was eventually repelled and their rule limited to Kashmir and the Punjab, with a capital at Sialkot.

724: Direct Muslim rule, with a governor appointed by the Caliph, was established in Sindh by Arab invaders.

1001: The Turkish-Afghan Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni (in Afghanistan) raided Peshawar and Waihand. He established a base in the Punjab and raided rich Hindu temples in the province to fund his Central Asian empire.

1005-1006: Mahmud of Ghazni captured the northern town of Multan.

1040: The Battle of Dandanqan between the Seljuks and the Ghaznavids resulted in the loss of Ghaznavid possessions in Persia and Afghanistan. The Ghaznavid state was henceforward centred on Lahore, in modern-day Pakistan.

1186: The Ghaznavids were displaced by the Ghurids, whose kingdom was based in central Afghanistan.

1206: The Delhi Sultanate, a Muslim dynasty of former military slaves, was established. It ruled much of the north of the subcontinent, including all of modern-day Pakistan. Many of the Sultans were of Central Asian Turkic ethnic origin, brought into the Sultanate as slaves and trained as soldiers for the army, but in later years they were Afghan.

1398: Timur (‘the Lame’—Tamerlane), the founder of the second Mongol Empire, invaded the Delhi Sultanate. Lahore, Multan and parts of Sindh were incorporated into his empire.

-239-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Political Chronology of Central, South and East Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Afghanistan 1
  • Bangladesh 15
  • Bhutan 30
  • The People’s Republic of China 35
  • China (taiwan) 87
  • India 104
  • Japan 135
  • Kazakhstan 158
  • The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (north Korea) 166
  • The Republic of Korea (south Korea) 180
  • Kyrgyzstan 205
  • The Maldives 213
  • Mongolia 217
  • Nepal 226
  • Pakistan 239
  • Sri Lanka 264
  • Tajikistan 286
  • Turkmenistan 295
  • Uzbekistan 302
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.