A Political Chronology of South-East Asia and Oceania

By David Lea; Colette Milward et al. | Go to book overview

Indonesia

2500 BC-500 BC: The early inhabitants of the archipelago developed an agricultural society based on the cultivation of cereals.

500 BC-AD 500: Through contact with other South and East Asian societies, metal-working and domesticated farm animals were introduced. The inhabitants also began to form tribal units.

1st-2nd centuries: Trade with the Bay of Bengal brought the islanders into contact with Indian beliefs and concepts.

3rd-5th centuries: The islanders exported cloves, tree resins and camphor to China.

7th century: The kingdom of Srivijaya was founded in eastern Sumatra on Indian principles. Its capital, Palembang, flourished through trade with China and India; the kingdom’s rulers were soon able to extract tribute from other tribes in the rest of Sumatra, western Java and the Malay peninsula.

early 8th century: The Sanjaya dynasty founded the Hindu kingdom of Mataram on the Dieng Plateau.

late 8th century: The Buddhist kingdom of the Sailendra family developed on the Kedu plain, causing the Mataram to lose power.

9th century: The temple of Borobudur was constructed by the Sailendras.

mid-9th century: The kingdom of Mataram was revived by rulers claiming descent from the Sanjayas; they proceeded to extend their rule over eastern Java. However, the following century, the influence of Hinduism on the state began to decline.

11th century: The Buddhist scholar, Atisha, visited Sumatra.

1019-49: During the reign of Airlangga, Mataram was united with Bali.

1222: Singosara separated from Mataram and began to develop into a kingdom in its own right, with Angrok as its first ruler.

1268-92: During the reign of the Buddhist king, Kertangara, Singosara extended its influence over the territory of the former kingdom of Srivijaya.

late 13th century: Merchants from southern India and Gujarat brought Islam to the coastal states of northern Sumatra. The first Muslim ruler on the islands was Sultan Malik al-Saleh of Pasai.

-58-

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A Political Chronology of South-East Asia and Oceania
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Australia 1
  • Brunei 16
  • Cambodia 22
  • East Timor 42
  • Fiji 50
  • Indonesia 58
  • Kiribati 81
  • Laos 85
  • Malaysia 96
  • Marshall Islands 108
  • Federated States of Micronesia 112
  • Myanmar 115
  • Nauru 127
  • New Zealand 131
  • Palau 145
  • Papua New Guinea 148
  • The Philippines 157
  • Samoa 176
  • Singapore 180
  • Solomon Islands 186
  • Thailand 191
  • Tonga 208
  • Tuvalu 211
  • Vanuatu 213
  • Vanuatu 215
  • Viet Nam 217
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