A Political Chronology of South-East Asia and Oceania

By David Lea; Colette Milward et al. | Go to book overview

Tonga

c. 1300 BC: The islands were settled by Polynesians.

c. AD 950: ’Aho’eitu founded the principal Tongan royal dynasty.

1470: Following instability in the royal court characterized by a series of assassinations, the 24th Tu’i Tonga delegated temporal powers to his younger brother, Takalaua, whilst retaining spiritual authority. Takalaua was given the title of Hau and a second royal dynasty, the Tu’i Ha’atakalaua clan, was established.

1610: A third line of kings was established when the sixth Tu’i Ha’atakalaua divided power with his younger brother giving him the title Tu’i Kanokupolu.

1643: The Dutchman, Abel Tasman, arrived in Tongatapu and Ha’apai.

1770s: The British Pacific explorer, James Cook, visited Tonga.

1797: The first Christian missionaries were sent from the London Missionary Society.

1799: The complexity of the relations between the three lines of kingship resulted in the murder of the Tu’i Kanokupolu Tuku’aho and provoked civil war.

1822: The Methodist Wesleyan missionary, William Lawry, arrived in Tonga.

1826: Taufa’ahau, son of Tu’i Kanokupolu Tupouto’a, defeated the Tu’i Tonga dynasty.

1845: King George Tupou I (as Taufa’ahau renamed himself) defeated the Tu’i Tonga , who were supported by Roman Catholic missionaries, and succeeded to the title of Tu’i Kanokupolu.

1862: The King instituted a legal code guaranteeing land ownership to all Tongans, and established a constitutional government, comprising a Privy Council chosen by him and representation for both nobles and commoners in a Legislative Assembly.

4 November 1875: King George Tupou I promulgated a Constitution that included a Declaration of Rights, securing freedom of speech, freedom of the press and freedom of worship.

1876: A Treaty of Friendship was signed with Germany, recognizing Tongan independence and the sovereignty of the monarch. Similar treaties were signed with the United Kingdom in 1879 and the USA in 1888.

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A Political Chronology of South-East Asia and Oceania
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Australia 1
  • Brunei 16
  • Cambodia 22
  • East Timor 42
  • Fiji 50
  • Indonesia 58
  • Kiribati 81
  • Laos 85
  • Malaysia 96
  • Marshall Islands 108
  • Federated States of Micronesia 112
  • Myanmar 115
  • Nauru 127
  • New Zealand 131
  • Palau 145
  • Papua New Guinea 148
  • The Philippines 157
  • Samoa 176
  • Singapore 180
  • Solomon Islands 186
  • Thailand 191
  • Tonga 208
  • Tuvalu 211
  • Vanuatu 213
  • Vanuatu 215
  • Viet Nam 217
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