A Political Chronology of South-East Asia and Oceania

By David Lea; Colette Milward et al. | Go to book overview

VANUATU

January 1989: Fred Timakata, the former Minister of Health, replaced Sokomanu as President.

March 1989: The trial of Sokomanu, Sope and their colleagues took place; Sokomanu was sentenced to six years’ imprisonment and Sope to five years’ for seditious conspiracy and incitement to mutiny. However, the following month the Court of Appeal overturned the original judgment citing insufficient evidence for the convictions.

6 September 1991: Lini lost a parliamentary motion of ‘no confidence’ and was replaced as Prime Minister by Donald Kalpokas, the President of the UP.

2 December 1991: At a general election, the UMP secured 19 of the 46 seats in the legislature, and proceeded to form a coalition Government with the NUP, which had obtained 10 seats. The UMP leader, Maxime Carlot, was elected Prime Minister.

2 March 1994: Following an inconclusive presidential election in February, at which no candidate secured the requisite two-thirds of the votes cast, the election was rescheduled for March and Jean-Marie Leye was elected President.

25 May 1994: A coalition Government was formed by the UMP and the newly formed People’s Democratic Party (PDP).

30 November 1995: At a general election the Unity Front coalition, comprising the VP, the MPP and the Tan Union, won 20 of the 50 seats in the newly enlarged Parliament and the UMP secured 17 seats. The President of the UMP, Serge Vohor was subsequently sworn in as Prime Minister, heading a coalition Government.

8 February 1996: Vohor resigned as Prime Minister in order to pre-empt a vote on a motion of ‘no confidence’ in his leadership. Later that month, Maxime Carlot was elected Prime Minister.

30 September 1996: Vohor was elected Prime Minister, with 28 of the 50 parliamentary votes, following the approval of a motion of ‘no confidence’ in the Government of Carlot.

12 October 1996: The country’s paramilitary service, the Vanuatu Mobile Force (VMF), abducted the President and Deputy Prime Minister in an attempt to reach a settlement over unpaid allowances.

12 November 1996: More than one-half of the members of the VMF were arrested, following the abduction of an official from the Department of Finance and the earlier abduction of the President and the Deputy Prime Minister.

20 May 1997: The defection of five NUP members to the VP prompted the Prime Minister to expel the latter from the Government and to form a new coalition, comprising the UMP, the MPP, the Tan Union and the Fren Melanesia.

27 November 1997: President Leye ordered the dissolution of Parliament in response to the filing by Carlot of a motion of ‘no confidence’ in Vohor’s administration, following which the parliamentary speaker, Edward Natapei, declared the legislative session closed. However, the dissolution of Parliament was overruled by the Supreme Court the following month.

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A Political Chronology of South-East Asia and Oceania
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Australia 1
  • Brunei 16
  • Cambodia 22
  • East Timor 42
  • Fiji 50
  • Indonesia 58
  • Kiribati 81
  • Laos 85
  • Malaysia 96
  • Marshall Islands 108
  • Federated States of Micronesia 112
  • Myanmar 115
  • Nauru 127
  • New Zealand 131
  • Palau 145
  • Papua New Guinea 148
  • The Philippines 157
  • Samoa 176
  • Singapore 180
  • Solomon Islands 186
  • Thailand 191
  • Tonga 208
  • Tuvalu 211
  • Vanuatu 213
  • Vanuatu 215
  • Viet Nam 217
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