U.S.-China Security Management: Assessing the Military-To-Military Relationship

By Kevin Pollpeter | Go to book overview

Preface

Controversy has surrounded the United States military-to-military relationship with China ever since rapprochement began in 1971. The current debate on Department of Defense activities with the People's Liberation Army (PLA) have focused attention on the value, rationale, and benefits of the relationship. This study documents the history of U.S. security management with China from 1971 to the present and, based on that history, examines the arguments for and against conducting certain types of activities with the PLA. It then recommends a program of suitable military-to-military activities based on prescribed constraints and goals.

The research reported here was sponsored by the Deputy Chief of Staff for Air and Space Operations, U.S. Air Force (AF/XO), and the Commander, Pacific Air Forces (PACAF/CC), and conducted in the Strategy and Doctrine Program of RAND Project AIR FORCE. The report should be of value to the national security community and interested members of the general public, especially those concerned with U.S. relations in the Asia-Pacific region. Comments are welcome and should be sent to the project leader, James Mulvenon, or the RAND Project AIR FORCE acting director of the Strategy and Doctrine Program, Alan Vick:

James C. Mulvenon 1200 South Hayes St. Arlington, VA 22202 (703) 413–1100 x5225 mulvenon@rand.org

Alan Vick 1200 South Hayes St. Arlington, VA 22202 (703) 413–1100 x5253 alanv@rand.org

-iii-

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U.S.-China Security Management: Assessing the Military-To-Military Relationship
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Rand Project Air Force iv
  • The Rand Corporation Quality Assurance Process v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Acronyms xix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Historical Context 5
  • Chapter Three - Strategic Factors Affecting U.S.-China Security Relations 29
  • Chapter Four - The U.S. Debate Over U.S.-China Military Relations 43
  • Chapter Five - Chinese Views of Military Relationships 75
  • Chapter Six - Conclusion and Recommendations 87
  • Bibliography 101
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