Eighteenth Century Economics: Turgot, Beccaria and Smith and Their Contemporaries

By Peter Groenewegen | Go to book overview
39Equilibrium and Disequilibrium in Economic Theory

The Marshall-Walras Divide

Edited by Michel de Vroey

40The German Historical School

The Historical and Ethical Approach to Economics

Edited by Yuichi Shionoya

41Reflections on the Classical Canon in Economics

Essays in Honor of Samuel Hollander

Edited by Sandra Peart and Evelyn Forget

42Piero Sraffa’s Political Economy

A Centenary Estimate

Edited by Terenzio Cozzi and Roberto Marchionatti

43The Contribution of Joseph A. Schumpeter to Economics

Richard Arena and Cecile Dangel

44On the Development of Long-run Neo-classical Theory

Tom Kompas

45F. A. Hayek as a Political Economist

Economic Analysis and Values

Edited by Jack Birner, Pierre Garrouste and Thierry Aimar

46Pareto, Economics and Society

The Mechanical Analogy

Michael McLure

47The Cambridge Controversies in Capital Theory

A Study in the Logic of Theory Development

Jack Birner

48Economics Broadly Considered

Essays in Honor of Warren J. Samuels

Edited by Steven G. Medema, Jeff Biddle and John B. Davis

49Physicians and Political Economy

Six Studies of the Work of Doctor-economists

Edited by Peter Groenewegen

50The Spread of Political Economy and the Professionalisation of Economists

Economic Societies in Europe, America and Japan in the Nineteenth Century

Massimo Augello and Marco Guidi

51Historians of Economics and Economic Thought

The Construction of Disciplinary Memory

Steven G. Medema and Warren J. Samuels

52Competing Economic Theories

Essays in memory of Giovanni Caravale

Sergio Nisticò and Domenico Tosato

53Economic Thought and Policy in Less Developed Europe

The Nineteenth Century

Edited by Michalis Psalidopoulos and Maria-Eugenia Almedia Mata

54Family Fictions and Family Facts

Harriet Martineau, Adolphe Quetelet and the Population Question in England 1798-1859

Brian Cooper

55Eighteeth-century Economics

Turgot, Beccaria and Smith and their Contemporaries

Peter Groenewegen

-iv-

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