Eighteenth Century Economics: Turgot, Beccaria and Smith and Their Contemporaries

By Peter Groenewegen | Go to book overview

5

Boisguilbert and eighteenth-century economics

Introduction

Boisguilbert is now very much a neglected economist, particularly in the English speaking world. None of his economic work has so far been translated into English and many general histories of economics pass his work silently by. Only more specialist English histories seem to mention him as an important seventeenth-century economic writer (for example, Hébert, 1987, pp. 187-91; Hutchison, 1988, pp. 107-15). In the nineteenth century, Marx (1859, pp. 54-5) described Boisguilbert together with Sir William Petty as one of the founders of classical political economy, but his assessments of Boisguilbert as an economic writer are largely confined to this work and are not included, for example, in his Theories of Surplus Value (for a discussion, see Groenewegen, 1987, pp. 28-30). The definitive edition of Boisguilbert’s economic contributions published by the Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques (Boisguilbert, 1966) is, in the spirit of Marx, appropriately subtitled ‘La Naissance de l’Economie Politique’, but this claim, generally speaking, would be regarded in many Anglo-Saxon circles as typical French nationalistic bombast. An American scholar (Hazel Van Dyke Roberts, 1935) pioneered English work on Boisguilbert during the twentieth century, for which she was honoured at an international symposium on Boisguilbert in 1975 (Hecht, 1989). Since Van Dyke Roberts’ pioneering study, detailed work on Boisguilbert has appeared in Nagels (1970), Spengler (1984) and Faccarello (1986) to name the more important work not yet mentioned.

This introduction to the facsimile reproduction of Boisguilbert’s first important economic text, Le Détail de la France sous le Règne de Louis XIV, focuses on the century when Boisguilbert’s work was most influential. It does so in three main sections. The first examines Boisguilbert’s influence on British thought, with special reference to Mandeville, Cantillon and Smith. The second looks briefly at Boisguilbert’s impact on French thought, with special references to the physiocrats; while the third section looks at his influence on the Tuscan, Neapolitan and Milanese schools of political economy in Italy. A final section offers some brief conclusions from this discussion in the context of assessing Boisguilbert’s place in the history of economic thought.

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eighteenth Century Economics: Turgot, Beccaria and Smith and Their Contemporaries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.