Eighteenth Century Economics: Turgot, Beccaria and Smith and Their Contemporaries

By Peter Groenewegen | Go to book overview

21

A new catalogue of Adam Smith’s library1

The history and contents of Adam Smith’s library have been of considerable interest to Smithian scholars and historians of economics for a long time. This has, of course, been due to the tremendous importance of the Wealth of Nations as a landmark in the history of the science and to the many controversies which have surrounded the supposed origins of Smith’s economic ideas. 2 For this reason, the appearance of a new catalogue of the library merits some attention.

The history of the library itself has been well chronicled by Dr James Bonar, the first editor of a catalogue of its contents. On the death of Smith his library passed to his cousin and heir, David Douglas (later Lord Reston), who in turn bequeathed it in equal portions to his two daughters, Mrs Cunningham of Prestonpans and Mrs Bannerman of Edinburgh.

On Mrs Bannerman’s death in 1897, the library passed to her son, The Rev. David Douglas Bannerman, who presented part of the collection to New College, Edinburgh, in 1884, adding the remainder in 1894. A large portion of Smith’s library is therefore at present housed in the library of a Faculty of Divinity, and has, as yet, not been completely catalogued. 3

The other portion of the Smith library has a more complicated history. As early as 1862 one of its items was presented by the Rev. W. B. Cunningham, Mrs Cunningham’s husband, to the economist J. R. McCulloch. Similar presentations cannot be excluded. 4 On the death of her husband in 1878 Mrs Cunningham sold part of the collection in Edinburgh, 5 while on her death the remainder went to her son, Professor R. O. Cunningham. Part of this remainder went during the lifetime of the latter to the library of Queens College, Belfast; the final part was sold on his death in 1918. In 1920 most of this final part was purchased by Professor I. Nitobe and sent by him to the Imperial University of Tokyo, where it survived both an earthquake and the Second World War. 6

These leakages from the Cunningham part of the library, as well as the incompleteness of the catalogue of the Bannerman collection, have made the compiling of a catalogue of Smith’s library a most difficult task. To this must be added the fact that all the leakages may not have been recorded since there is a great possibility that Adam Smith himself, Lord Reston, the Bannermans and the Cunninghams, made several small and informal presentations like the one

-379-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Eighteenth Century Economics: Turgot, Beccaria and Smith and Their Contemporaries
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.