Understanding Terrorism in America: From the Klan to Al Qaeda

By Christopher Hewitt | Go to book overview

Notes
1
The FBI’s estimate of 40,000 for 1965 is close to that of the Anti-defamation League, but the House Committee on Un-American Activities report gives a much lower figure of 16,800 for 1967.
2
Although Kennedy had pledged during his 1960 election campaign to ban racial discrimination in federally assisted housing, he delayed issuing the order until November 1962.
3
Using the southern governors’ speeches reported in Sarratt as an indicator, the number of segregationist and extremist speeches, by state, was Arkansas (twelve), Mississippi (eleven), Virginia (ten), Alabama (seven), Louisiana (four), Georgia (four), Florida (two), South Carolina (one), and North Carolina (one).
4
In the 1960 presidential elections, the National States’ Rights Party was on the ballot in four southern states, while “unpledged Democrats” won all of Mississippi’s electoral votes and six out of Alabama’s eleven electoral votes. The 1964 Goldwater vote and the 1968 Wallace vote are considered segregationist.
5
Editors who deviated from the segregationist position lost readers and advertising. Some were driven out of business, assaulted on the street, or had their offices bombed. Hodding Carter of the Delta Democrat-Times was hanged in effigy (Sarratt 1966:256-8).
6
Both the Panthers and the black Muslims were largely drawn from the urban underclass, and both had a significant criminal element (Anthony 1990:102; Friedly 1992:176).
7
Essien-Udom distinguishes between different degrees of involvement, and estimated that in 1960 there were “between 5,000 and 15,000 registered followers, at least 50,000 believers, and a much larger number of sympathizers” (1962:71). Clegg (1997:115) suggests 20,000 members as the high point in the early 1960s, with “tens of thousands” of sympathizers.
8
The two measures are not as correlated as one might assume, and some who had a favorable view of the Weathermen identified themselves as “far right” politically.
9
This presumes that attitudes were similar on Puerto Rico and the mainland. Given the high degree of back-and-forth migration, and the fact that many independistas convicted of terrorism had been brought up on the mainland, this seems a reasonable assumption.
10
“What can I do that won’t get me in trouble?” Johnson asked McGeorge Bundy, but soon decided that he had little option but to maintain a hostile stance (Paterson 1994:262).
11
In one 1980 poll, when respondents were first asked if they supported a constitutional ban on abortions, 62 percent were opposed and 29 percent in favor, but when asked later about their opinion on a constitutional amendment “protecting the life of the unborn child,” they supported the amendment 50 percent to 39 percent (Craig 1993:264-71).
12
I have been unable to find more recent surveys on this particular question. In a poll released by the Anti-defamation League on its web site www.adl.org 25 percent of those surveyed thought that “Jews are more loyal to Israel than America.” In 1998 the figure was 31 percent.

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Understanding Terrorism in America: From the Klan to Al Qaeda
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables viii
  • Illustrations x
  • Series Editors’ Preface xi
  • Preface xvi
  • 1 - The Latest Atrocity 1
  • 2 - Before September 11 12
  • 3 - The Political Context of American Terrorism 23
  • Notes 51
  • 4 - The Organizational Dynamics of Terrorism 53
  • 5 - The Terrorists 69
  • 6 - Dealing with Terrorists 82
  • 7 - Impacts and Consequences 106
  • 8 - The Future of American Terrorism 119
  • Appendix 134
  • Bibliography 138
  • Index 149
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 158

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.