An Environmental History of the World: Humankind's Changing Role in the Community of Life

By J. Donald Hughes | Go to book overview

Contents
List of figuresix
Acknowledgmentsxi
Permissionsxiii
1Introduction: history and ecology1
Environmental history4
The community of life5
Community ecology and history6
Ecological process7
2Primal harmony12
The Serengeti: kinship of humans with other forms of life14
Kakadu, Australia: the primal tradition19
Hopi, Arizona: agriculture in the spirit of the land22
Conclusion27
3The great divorce of culture and nature30
The Uruk Wall: Gilgamesh and urban origins33
The Nile Valley: ancient Egypt and sustainability38
Tikal: the collapse of classic Maya culture42
Conclusion48
4Ideas and impacts52
Athens: mind and practice59
Xian: Chinese environmental problems and solutions66
Rome: environmental reasons for the decline and fall73
Conclusion78
5The Middle Ages83
Florence and the European scene: the barriers to growth86
Tahiti, Hawai’i, New Zealand: Polynesian impacts on island ecosystems93

-vii-

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An Environmental History of the World: Humankind's Changing Role in the Community of Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Permissions xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Primal Harmony 12
  • 3 - The Great Divorce of Culture and Nature 30
  • 4 - Ideas and Impacts 52
  • 5 - The Middle Ages 83
  • 6 - The Transformation of the Biosphere 109
  • 7 - Exploitation and Conservation 141
  • Notes 169
  • 8 - Modern Environmental Problems 174
  • 9 - Present and Future 206
  • 10 - A General Conclusion 238
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliographical Essay 242
  • Index 249
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