Risk and Technological Culture: Towards a Sociology of Virulence

By Joost Van Loon | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book would not have been possible without the immense support I received from countless people, many of whom I will undoubtedly have failed to mention and to whom I sincerely apologize. First of all, I would like to thank John Urry and Mari Shullow for helping me to conceptualize the book and its outline and for their continued support throughout the years it has taken to come into being. I also thank the anonymous reviewers for helping me to see more clearly the errors of my ways, and Nottingham Trent University for giving me additional support to do the research and writing. I am most grateful to the many dear friends and colleagues with whom I have tried out different ideas over the years: Rob Shields, Ian Roderick, Neil Turnbull, Irene Hardill, Francesca Bargiela, Deborah Chambers, Harry Wels, Ulrich Beck, Willem Koot, Neal Curtis, Mike Featherstone, John Tomlinson, Marsha Smith, Stuart Allan, Ian Welsh, Cindy Carter, Rosemary McKechnie, Barbara Adam, Sarah Franklin, Claudia Castaneda, Bruno Latour, Marc Berg, Scott Lash, Celia Lury, Mariam Fraser, Sabine Hofmeister, Ida Sabelis, Sierk Ybema and Frederick Vanderberghe. I also want to thank friends outside the academy whose thoughts have greatly influenced me, most notably Emma and Alex van Spijk, Fr Chris O’Connor, Fr Mark Brentnall and Fr Paul Chipchase. Above all, however, I would like to thank my wife and best friend Esther Bolier for her sharp insights and constructive criticism and our children Amy, Mark and Anna, who have endured much during the writing of this book and whose relentless enthusiasm and joy for life has made the sacrifices needed for its completion bearable. This book would not have been possible without their unconditional love and support.

Parts of Chapter 8 have been published as ‘Mediating the Risks of Virtual Environments’ in Allan, S., Adam, B. and Carter, C. (eds) (2000) Environmental Risks and the Media. London: Routledge.

Parts of Chapter 9 have been published as ‘Whiter Shades of Pale: Media Hybridities of Rodney King’ in Brah, A., Hickman, M.J. and Mac an Ghaill, M. (eds) (1999) Thinking Identities: Ethnicity, Racism and Culture. London: Macmillan.

-x-

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Risk and Technological Culture: Towards a Sociology of Virulence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface viii
  • Acknowledgements x
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Part I - Theoretical Framework 17
  • 2 - Cultivating Risks 19
  • 3 - Enrolling Risks in Technocultural Practices 45
  • 4 - Assemblages and Deviations 63
  • 5 - A Theoretical Framework 88
  • Part II - The Four Riders of the Apocalypse 103
  • 6 - Cultivating Waste 105
  • 7 - Emergent Pathogen Virulence 123
  • 8 - Cyberrisks 147
  • 9 - Race, Riots and Risk 169
  • 10 - Conclusion 185
  • References 212
  • Index 227
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