ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I am grateful to the editors of this series, Simon Critchley and Keith Ansell Pearson, and to the two Routledge editors with whom I have worked in the course of this project, Adrian Driscoll and Tony Bruce, for their support and patience. I am especially indebted to Keith Ansell Pearson and to the two readers to whom Routledge sent the manuscript for their generous and helpful editorial comments. I am also grateful to a number of people who read draft versions of all or part of this book and made helpful suggestions: Duncan Ivison, Saul Newman, Kara Shaw and Charles Stivale. I would also like to thank Melissa McMahon for her work both as research assistant and as Deleuze scholar, Carl Power for his helpful guidance with regard to Bergson and Peter Cook for preparing the index. Many others have helped me to understand the work of Deleuze and Guattari, through their publications and in conference presentations and discussions over the last decade, including Ronald Bogue, Bruce Baugh, Rosi Braidotti, Constantin Boundas, Philip Goodchild, Michael Hardt, Eugene Holland, Brian Massumi, Gregg Lambert, Dorothea Olkowski, Jean-Clet Martin, Todd May, Alan Schrift, Daniel Smith and Charles Stivale. Constantin Boundas has played a very special role in creating a community of Deleuze scholars who share his passion. Finally, and most of all, I am grateful to Moira Gatens for her presence, her support and her constructive engagement with this work over many years. Some of the material included here is drawn from my previously published work. I am grateful for permission to reprint passages from the following articles and chapters:

‘Conceptual politics and the war-machine in Mille Plateaux’, Substance, no. 44/45, 1984, pp. 61-80.

‘Anti-Platonism and art’, in Constantin V. Boundas and Dorothea Olkowski (eds) Gilles Deleuze and the Theater of Philosophy, New York and London: Routledge, 1994, pp. 141-56.

-vii-

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Deleuze and the Political
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Concept and Image of Thought 11
  • 2 - Difference and Multiplicity 29
  • 3 - Power 49
  • 4 - Desire, Becoming and Freedom 68
  • 5 - Social Machines and the State 88
  • 6 - Nomads, Capture and Colonisation 109
  • Conclusion 132
  • Notes 138
  • References 149
  • Index 159
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