1

CONCEPT AND IMAGE OF THOUGHT

Deleuze’s conception of philosophy

For many critics, Deleuze and Guattari’s political philosophy remains an enigma. Their language is often unfamiliar, confronting the reader with an apparently endless series of new terms: plateaus, order-words, segmentarity, becomings and nomadic war-machines, to mention only some of their neologisms. The difficulty of their thought is a result both of the proliferation of new concepts and of its form. A Thousand Plateaus (1987) is an avowedly experimental work which appears to lack coherent argument or structure of any kind. As the Introduction suggests, it is a rhizome book which grows in all directions. Its aim is not to represent the world but, through its specific form of conceptual deterritorialisation, to connect with movements of deterritorialisation in other social assemblages. The concept of ‘assemblage’ provides a kind of formal continuity to the book to the extent that the successive ‘plateaus’ both define and describe a series of assemblages: machinic assemblages of desire, collective assemblages of enunciation, territorial assemblages and so on. 1 The series is open ended. In each plateau, specific concepts are proposed in order to analyse the relevant content (language, desire, music, the social field) in terms of the assemblages which inhabit that field. While there is a degree of continuity across the different plateaus, there is also continuous conceptual variation: concepts recur, but always in different relations to other concepts such that their identity in turn is transformed. The book itself is a particular kind of assemblage of concepts and conceptual plateaus.

Yet Deleuze has always regarded his work with Guattari as philosophy in a very traditional sense of the word: ‘A philosophy is what Félix and I tried to produce in Anti-Oedipus and A Thousand Plateaus, especially in A Thousand Plateaus, which is a long book putting forward many concepts’ (Deleuze 1995b:136). 2 In order to reconcile such description with the unorthodox content and style of this work, it is helpful to turn to the conception of philosophy outlined by Deleuze and Guattari in What Is Philosophy? (1994). At first glance, their definition of philosophy as the creation of concepts is uncontroversial: political philosophy provides many examples of conceptual invention, from Plato’s Republic to modern

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Deleuze and the Political
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Concept and Image of Thought 11
  • 2 - Difference and Multiplicity 29
  • 3 - Power 49
  • 4 - Desire, Becoming and Freedom 68
  • 5 - Social Machines and the State 88
  • 6 - Nomads, Capture and Colonisation 109
  • Conclusion 132
  • Notes 138
  • References 149
  • Index 159
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.