NOTES

INTRODUCTION
1
We are not concerned in this book to separate the contributions of Deleuze and Guattari to the work published under both their names. However, the focus is on Deleuze’s political thought and we read their collaborative work against the background of his earlier philosophy.
2
See Deleuze and Guattari 1987:69; Deleuze and Parnet 1987:117. On Deleuze’s concept of concepts and their relation to metaphor, see Patton 1997c.
3
The original title of this book is Empirisme et subjectivité: essai sur la nature humaine selon Hume. Deleuze argues that Hume presents an idea of society that is opposed to that of the social contract theorists. ‘The main idea is this: the essence of society is not the law but the institution. The law, in fact, is a limitation of enterprise and action, and it focuses only on a negative aspect of society…The institution, unlike the law, is not a limitation but rather a model of actions, a veritable enterprise, an invented system of positive means or a positive invention of indirect means…The social is profoundly creative, inventive, and positive…Society is a set of conventions founded on utility, not a set of obligations founded on contract’ (Deleuze 1991:45-6).
4
Guattari’s exact words were: ‘Nous faisons partie d’une génération dont la conscience politique est née dans l’enthousiasme et la naïveté de la Libération, avec sa mythologie conjuratoire du fascisme’ (Deleuze and Guattari 1972:15).
5
Several short publications by Deleuze dealing with Palestine and the Gulf War have been translated in a special issue of Discourse, vol. 20, no. 3, Fall 1998. On Palestine, see Deleuze 1998b, 1998c, 1998d and Deleuze and Sanbar 1998. On the Gulf War, see Deleuze et al. 1998 and Deleuze and Scherer 1998.
6
‘We no longer maintain an image of the proletarian of which it is enough to become conscious’ (Deleuze 1995b:173 trans. modified).
7
See also the discussion of public and private thinkers in ‘1227: Treatise on nomadology—the war-machine’ (Deleuze and Guattari 1987:376-7).
8
‘Politics is active experimentation, since we do not know in advance which way a line is going to turn’ (Deleuze and Parnet 1987:137).
9
In this manner, Gatens and Lloyd suggest that ‘Spinoza’s own political philosphy is folded into the metaphysical and ethical concerns addressed in the Ethics’ (Gatens and Lloyd 1999:8).
10
The important distinction between absolute and relative deterritorialization is discussed in Chapter 5, pp. 106-7.

-138-

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Deleuze and the Political
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Concept and Image of Thought 11
  • 2 - Difference and Multiplicity 29
  • 3 - Power 49
  • 4 - Desire, Becoming and Freedom 68
  • 5 - Social Machines and the State 88
  • 6 - Nomads, Capture and Colonisation 109
  • Conclusion 132
  • Notes 138
  • References 149
  • Index 159
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