Athens and Sparta: Constructing Greek Political and Social History from 478 BC

By Anton Powell | Go to book overview

Introduction

This work is intended as a handbook for the bright student beginning Greek history. It deals with method as well as with fact. It attempts to present an unusually large selection of the ancient evidence, and to provide clear analysis and narrative. We seek to highlight problems and to demonstrate explicitly some of the more important techniques of criticism and construction used by professional historians. It is hoped to suggest something of the contribution which Greek history can make to a liberal education, and to communicate the enjoyment to be had from careful exploitation of the Greek sources.

The shape of the book has been determined by the supply of good ancient literary evidence. Political history is studied in most detail for the period 478-411 BC, for which we have the evidence of Thucydides; the last years of the Peloponnesian War, from 410 to 404 BC, are treated in outline. Our review of social history covers the fourth century as well as the fifth. Important inscriptional evidence is dealt with. But, since the book presumes no knowledge of Greek in the reader, there is no attempt to treat the reconstruction of epigraphic fragments.

The playwright Tom Stoppard has a character say that journalists do not write for the public; they write for other journalists. The warning implied in this useful overstatement is one which historians, too, should keep in mind when we write textbooks. In selecting and arranging material for the present work, the author has tried to apply his own experience of the needs of students new to the subject. For example, a teacher should probably begin a course of Greek history by stressing that in this subject the required (and enlightened) procedure is, not to repeat or synthesise the arguments of modern writers, but to look at what ancient sources say and to use independent judgement in

-xii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Athens and Sparta: Constructing Greek Political and Social History from 478 BC
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vi
  • Introduction xii
  • 1 - The Delian League: Its Origins and Early History 1
  • 2 - From Delian League to Athenian Empire 35
  • 3 - The Athenian Empire 60
  • 4 - Sparta: Her Problems and Her Ingenuity, 478-431 97
  • 5 - The Peloponnesian War, 431-404 138
  • Notes 202
  • 6 - Life Within Sparta 218
  • 7 - Athenian Dēmokratia 271
  • 8 - Citizen Women of Athens 348
  • 9 - Religious Prophecy at Athens 404
  • Appendix 436
  • Index 449
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 464

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.