Enter the Body: Women and Representation on Shakespeare's Stage

By Carol Chillington Rutter | Go to book overview

3

SHADOWING CLEOPATRA

Making whiteness strange

Think on me

That am with Phoebus’ amorous pinches black…

Antony and Cleopatra (1.5.28-29)

‘Cleopatra wasn’t black’

John Caird, Director, Antony and Cleopatra, RSC, 1992

Othello represents a site through which the problem of the black body in the white imaginary becomes visible, gets worked through.

Barbara Hodgdon, The Shakespeare Trade, 1998


Images

Four black-and-white production photographs lie side by side on the library table. When they first turned up in the Royal Shakespeare Company archives, they took me aback. The earliest captures a representation of race so embarrassingly crude that it put me in mind of Al Jolson singing ‘Swanee’ in The Jazz Singer. It’s an image that works a cruel retrospective exposure upon the post-war, post-imperial cultural moment in Britain that produced it. The only way I (whose racial consciousness reached adolescence in the summer of 1969, post-Kennedy, post-Martin Luther King, forced into thought by black power and stu-dent protest) could read this image without aversion was historically, as a witness of ‘the way we were’. Later, though, dozens of similar images from subsequent productions emerged from the archives. Seeing in them newer versions of what I’d taken to be a redundant racial representation continuously re-inserted into contemporary performance, I realized I wasn’t looking at ‘history’ but at politics—a politics of performance.

The production photograph is, of course, an odd sort of document, both a record and a non-record, for it violates two basic conditions of theatrical activity: that performance happens continuously, across time, and that performance is ephemeral. It’s not supposed to last. 1 The photograph

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Enter the Body: Women and Representation on Shakespeare's Stage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • 1 - Body Parts or Parts for Bodies 1
  • 2 - Snatched Bodies 27
  • 3 - Shadowing Cleopatra 57
  • 4 - Designs on Shakespeare 104
  • 5 - Remembering Emilia 142
  • Bibliography 202
  • Index 212
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.