Masquerade and Identities: Essays on Gender, Sexuality, and Marginality

By Efrat Tseëlon | Go to book overview

PLATES
1.1 Mask shop in Venice. The masked mask sustains the illusion that whatever is deeper is somehow more true. 19
1.2 A mime artist in the Venice carnival. It takes only a coat of paint to transform a human face into a mask-like face. 21
1.3 The mask of the Trestle Theatre Company appears more expressive than the mask of the Japanese Noh theatre, yet both come to life only through the actor’s body. a) Trestle Theatre masks in the production Top Storey b) A Japanese Noh mask 23
1.4 The Fair Nun Unmasked, Henry Moreland c.1730-1737, Leeds Museums and Galleries. 31
1.5 Military Figure, Kenny Hunter, 1998. 32
3.1 Radclyffe Hall by Howard Coster. 55
3.2 Self-portraits by Claude Cahun a) c. 1920 b) c. 1929 c) c. 1927 60
3.3 Rosy Martin, ‘Even the plumpest girl can stand with poise and elegance’ (inspired by Anne Webb, Growing Up Gracefully, 1956). 64
3.4 Rosy Martin, ‘Women use their bodies far more than men to support their personality, even when they have a pretty face to attract attention’ (inspired by Liselotte Strenlow, Photographic Portrait Management, 1966). 65
3.5 Rosy Martin, ‘Transforming the Suit: what do Lesbians Look Like? Part 1, “Obsessed by their unobtainable goals to be men, they wore the most sombre uniforms: black tuxedos as though they were in mourning for their ideal masculinity”’ (inspired by Brassai, ‘Sodom and Gomorrah’ in The Secret Paris of the Thirties, 1932). 66

-ix-

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Masquerade and Identities: Essays on Gender, Sexuality, and Marginality
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates ix
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgements xix
  • References 15
  • 1 - Reflections on Mask and Carnival 18
  • 2 - Stigma, Uncertain Identity and Skill in Disguise 38
  • 3 - Lesbian Masks 54
  • 4 - Fashion, Fetish, Fantasy 73
  • References 81
  • 5 - Is Womanliness Nothing but a Masquerade? 83
  • 6 - The Scarf and the Toothache 101
  • Note 112
  • 7 - The Metamorphosis of the Mask in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century London 114
  • References 133
  • 8 - Masked and Unmasked at the Opera Balls 135
  • References 150
  • 9 - On Women and Clothes and Carnival Fools 153
  • References 170
  • Index 175
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