Ireland's Independence, 1880-1923

By Oonagh Walsh | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR

The Anglo-lrish War, January 1919 to July 1921

The Anglo-Irish War, also known as the War of Independence, began on 21 January 1919, and ended in a truce on 9 July 1921. This short period marked great changes for the country, in which forces of democracy and revolution progressed hand in hand. The campaign for independence was conducted on two fronts. The first was the establishment of a de facto republic, with its own judicial and administrative system, which operated entirely independently of British administered rule. The second was a military campaign, conducted by the newly formed Irish Republican Army, which harried and harassed the crown forces throughout the country. In many cases, the same individuals were active in both arenas. This chapter will examine these two developments, and their interdependence, up to the truce of 1921.

The end of the First World War was greeted with general relief. Aside from the obvious benefits of the cessation of violence, ordinary people could now look forward to political change. The suffrage campaign, so hard fought before the war, was finally about to bear fruit. On 6 February, the electorate had been significantly enlarged through the enfranchisement in Ireland of all men over the age of 21 and most women over age 30. Thus those eligible to vote grew from over 700,000 in 1910 to almost two million in 1918. The general election of 14 December was the first opportunity for these new voters, who were for the most part nationalist in their politics, to express their opinions. The results were certainly dramatic. Sinn Féin swept the board, increasing its seats to seventy-three from seven. Unionist strength increased by eight to twenty-six. There were no Labour members, their having agreed with Sinn Féin not to run candidates in order to prevent splitting

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ireland's Independence, 1880-1923
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 130

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.