CONTRIBUTORS

Robin Barrow is Dean and Professor of Education at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Professor Barrow is the author of numerous books and articles in the fields of classics, philosophy and education, including The Philosophy of Schooling, Understanding Skills and (with Geoffrey Milburn) A Critical Dictionary of Educational Concepts.

David Carr is reader at the Moray House Institute of Education, Edinburgh. He has published widely in philosophical and educational journals and is the author of Educating the Virtues. He is currently engaged in editing two educational philosophical collections of essays for Routledge, one in knowledge, truth and education, the other (with Jan Stewart) on virtue ethics and moral education.

Penny Enslin is Professor of Education at the University of Witwater-strand, Johannesburg. Her research interests are in the areas of practical philosophy, feminist theory and education. Recent publications include: ‘The family and the private in education for democratic citizenship’, which is in David Bridges (ed.) Education, Autonomy and Democratic Citizenship in a Changing World, and ‘Contemporary liberalism and civic education in South Africa’.

Peter Gilroy is Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Sheffield, Director, CPD and deputy editor of the international Journal of Education for Teaching. His publications include Meaning within Words and Philosophy, First Language Acquisition and International Analyses of Teacher Education.

Morwenna Griffiths is Professor of Educational Research at Nottingham Trent University. Her current research interests focus on social justice, gender and educational research. She is the author of Educational Research for Social Justice: Getting off the Fence; Feminisms and the Self: The Web of Identity; Self-identity, Self-esteem and Social justice; (with Carol Davies) In Fairness to Children; and Working for Social Justice in the Primary School, and she has edited (with Barry Troyna), Anti-racism, Culture and Social Justice in Education, and (with Margaret Whitford) Women Review Philosophy: New Writing by Women in Philosophy, and (with Margaret Whitford) FeministWilliam Hare is Professor at Mount St Vincent University, Halifax, Nova

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