INDEX
accountability 82-3;
of schools 138
actual policy 8
African National Congress (ANC) 108
alternative curricula 166
American Philosophical Association 86
Arendt, Hannah 146, 154
Aristotle 146, 165
Ausubel 159
autonomy 74-83, 113, 171;
and complexity of society 75-6;
education, politics and 76-8;
of the individual 176;
of the self 176;
strong, as educational aim 78-80, 174, 175;
strong, in independent education 80-2;
weak 78, 174
Ayer, A. J. 159
Barzun, Jacques 95
behavioural objectives 161
behaviourism 160
Berkeley 158
Berlin, Isaiah 113-14, 116, 175, 176, 183, 184
Bjelke-Petersen, Flo 4
Bjelke-Petersen, Joh 4, 9
Brown, L. M. 2
Bruner, Jerome 3, 6, 142, 146, 160;
Man
(1964) 144
burdens of judgement 52
California State University system 86
Callan, Eamonn 51, 115, 116, 177
Carnap, Rudolf 159
Catholic Church 16
Catholic Women’s League 4
Cavarero, Adriana 145
Cave myth 39
child-centred education 31
choice, notion of 139
Christian Mission to the Communist World 4
Christian National Education (CNE) (1948) 104
citizen’s rights 79
citizenship 50
civic liberties 62
cognitive psychology 160
Committee against Regressive Education (CARE) 4, 5, 8
Committee on Morals and Education 4
communitarianism 119
Community Standards Organisation 4
comprehensive doctrines 52, 53-5, 58;
pluralism of 56
conceptions of the good life 64
cooperation and co-construction, model of 150-53
Courier-Mail5
critical attitude 62
critical thinking 62, 63-6, 85-96, 175;
conceptions of the good and their intrinsic value 65-6;
definition 87-9;
emergence of the ideal 85-7;
importance of 94-5;
objections to 92-4;
political policy and legislation 63-4;
skills and attitudes 89-92
cultural diversity 58
cultural pluralism 57
curriculum planning 157-68;
central planning 157-8;
grammar and semantics of curriculum discourse 164-6;
moral basis 166-8;
problems in 161-4;
as a science 158-61
Dartington Hall 81
Dearden, Richard F. 31, 32, 33, 113;
‘Autonomy and education’ 32
Dearing Report 138
democratic character 50
Derrida, Jacques 42
Descartes, R. 86, 95, 148, 153, 159, 165
desire-satisfaction 141
Despland, Michel 41, 42
development/exercise dichotomy 115
Dewey, John 31, 37-8, 42, 86, 89, 138, 140
Dickens, Charles: Hard Times159
didactic theology 41

-210-

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