The Archaeology of Britain: An Introduction from the Upper Palaeolithic to the Industrial Revolution

By John Hunter; Ian Ralston | Go to book overview

commercial transactions. Arguably, the combination of Roman expansion and indigenous developments has exaggerated the real degree of change by artificially highlighting the period and by rendering the Late Iron Age elites archaeologically visible in a way unknown since the Bronze Age. These are some of the key themes awaiting investigation.


Key texts

c
Champion, T.C. and Collis, J.R. (eds) 1996. The Iron Age in Britain and Ireland: recent trends. Sheffield: J.R. Collis Publications.
Cunliffe, B.W., 1991. Iron Age communities in Britain. London: Routledge. 3 edn.
Cunliffe, B.W., 1995. Iron Age Britain. London: Batsford.

g
Gwilt, A. and Haselgrove, C.C. (eds.) 1997. Reconstructing Iron Age societies: new approaches to the British Iron Age. Oxford: Oxbow Monograph 71.

j
James, S.T. and Rigby, V., 1997. Britain and the Celtic Iron Age. London: British Museum Press.

Bibliography

b
Bersu, G., 1940. ‘Excavations at Little Woodbury, Wiltshire’, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 6, 30-111.

c
Coles, J.M. and Minnitt, S., 1995. Industrious and fairly civilised: the Glastonbury Lake Village. Taunton: Somerset Levels Project.
Cunliffe, B.W., 1993. Danebury. London: Batsford/English Heritage.

d
Dent, J.S., 1985. ‘Three cart burials from Wetwang, Yorkshire’, Antiquity 59, 85-92.
De Jersey, P., 1996. Celtic coinage in Britain. Princes Risborough: Shire.

e
Ehrenreich, R.M., 1985. Trade, technology and the iron working community in the Iron Age of southern Britain. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports British Series 144.

f
Fitzpatrick, A.P., 1997. Archaeological excavations on the route of the A27 Westhampnett Bypass, West Sussex: Volume 2: the cemeteries. Salisbury: Wessex Archaeological Report 12.
Fox, C.F., 1932. The personality of Britain. Cardiff: National Museum of Wales. 2 edn.
Fox, C.F., 1946. A find of the early Iron Age from Llyn Cerrig Bach, Anglesey. Cardiff: National Museum of Wales.

h
Haselgrove, C.C., 1989. ‘The later Iron Age in southern Britain and beyond’, in Todd, M. (ed.) Research on Roman Britain 1960-89, 1-18. London: Britannia Monograph 11.
Haselgrove, C.C., 1998. ‘Iron Age Britain and its European setting’, in Collis, J.R. (ed.) Actes du XVIII Colloque de l’AFEAF, Winchester, 1994. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press.
Hawkes, C.F.C., 1960. ‘The British Iron Age’, in Frere, S.S. (ed.) Problems of the Iron Age in southern Britain, 1-16. London: Institute of Archaeology, Occasional Paper 11.
Hill, J.D., 1995a. ‘The Iron Age in Britain and Ireland (c.800 BC-AD 100): an overview’, Journal of World Prehistory 9, 47-98.
Hill, J.D., 1995b. Ritual and rubbish in the Iron Age of Wessex. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports British Series 242.
Hingley, R., 1992. ‘Society in Scotland from 700 BC-AD 200’, Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland 122, 7-53.
Hodson, F.R., 1964. ‘Cultural groupings within the pre-Roman British Iron Age’, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 30, 99-110.

l
Lambrick, G., 1992. ‘The development of later prehistoric and Roman farming on the Thames gravels’, in Fulford, M. and Nichols, E. (eds) Developing landscapes of lowland Britain; the archaeology of the British gravels: a review, 78-105. London: Society of Antiquaries of London Occasional Paper 14.

m
Morris, E.L., 1994. ‘Production and distribution of pottery and salt in Iron Age Britain: a review’, Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 60, 371-394.

p
Parfitt, K., 1995. Iron Age burials from Mill Hill, Deal. London: British Museum Press.
Peacock, D.P.S., 1968. ‘A contribution to the study of Glastonbury ware from south-west Britain’, Antiquaries Journal 46, 41-61.
Pryor, E, 1984. Excavations at Fengate, Peterborough, England: the 4th report. Northampton: Northamptonshire Archaeological Monograph 2.

r
Ralston, I.B.M., 1979. ‘The Iron Age: northern Britain’, in Megaw, J.V.S. and Simpson, D.D.A. (eds) Introduction to British Prehistory, 446-501. Leicester: Leicester University Press.

s
Sharples, N.M., 1991. Maiden Castle. London: Batsford/English Heritage.

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