Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture

By Eamonn Rodgers; Valerie Rodgers | Go to book overview

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Structure
The Encyclopedia contains over 700 alphabetically arranged, signed entries, ranging from concise, factual contributions to longer overview essays. For readers with a particular interest, a thematic contents list on p. xiv groups entries according to subject, e.g. music or the visual arts. In the body of each entry direct cross-references, indicated in bold type, lead to other relevant articles, while a ‘see also’ section at the end suggests related topics. Biographical entries contain dates and places of birth and death, wherever the information is readily available, followed by the profession of the subject. Place-names have mostly been kept in their Spanish form, except where the Anglicized form is in common use among English speakers (e.g. Andalusia and Seville). To avoid ambiguity in the meaning of the term ‘billion’, large sums of currency are given in millions. A billón pesetas (in Spanish a million million) is expressed as a million squared (m2). For instance 20m2 indicates twenty billón.
Bibliographic items
These are divided into 3 sections:
1 Bibliography/Filmography/Discography—a selection of the entrant’s work.
2 References—items which are mentioned in the body of the article.
3 Further reading—suggestions for sources for further study, in most cases including annota-tions indicating content or relevance.

In the body of the entries, the titles of books have been translated. Where published translations already exist, the English title is given first, followed by the original in parentheses; otherwise a literal translation of the title is given in parentheses. An exception is made for the titles of most plays and films, since it is not always possible to know whether a performance of a play outside Spain was in the original language, in translation, or whether the same translated title was used in different performances. The English title has been used for plays printed in translation, and for a small number of films, when it is reasonably clear that the film has been distributed under this title in both Britain and the US.

-xiii-

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction x
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Structure xiii
  • Architecture xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 7
  • Further Reading 11
  • Further Reading 29
  • Further Reading 37
  • Further Reading 41
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 47
  • Further Reading 65
  • C 70
  • Further Reading 81
  • Further Reading 93
  • Further Reading 100
  • Further Reading 113
  • Further Reading 128
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 136
  • Further Reading 140
  • E 152
  • Further Reading 155
  • Further Reading 166
  • Further Reading 171
  • F 173
  • Further Reading 185
  • Further Reading 206
  • G 213
  • Further Reading 227
  • Further Reading 229
  • Further Reading 231
  • Further Reading 242
  • H 245
  • I 261
  • Further Reading 266
  • J 276
  • Further Reading 280
  • K 283
  • L 285
  • Further Reading 292
  • M 313
  • Further Reading 332
  • Further Reading 335
  • N 359
  • Further Reading 362
  • Further Reading 365
  • O 376
  • P 384
  • Further Reading 429
  • Q 430
  • R 433
  • Further Reading 435
  • Further Reading 436
  • Further Reading 439
  • Further Reading 443
  • References 452
  • S 464
  • Further Reading 471
  • Further Reading 475
  • T 502
  • Further Reading 508
  • Further Reading 509
  • U 526
  • Further Reading 536
  • V 537
  • Further Reading 538
  • Further Reading 539
  • Further Reading 544
  • W 545
  • X 550
  • Y 552
  • Further Reading 553
  • Z 554
  • Index 557
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