Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture

By Eamonn Rodgers; Valerie Rodgers | Go to book overview

C

Caballé, Montserrat

b. 1933, Barcelona

Opera singer

One of the great sopranos of her generation, Montserrat Caballé became a household name in the many countries of the world where she performed during her career. She made her début in 1956 with the Basel Opera, playing Mimi in Puccini’s La Bohème. During the next ten years Montserrat Caballé toured the major opera houses of Europe, singing German and later the lyrical Italian operas. In 1965 she made a sensational New York début in Donizetti’s Lucrezia Borgia.

As well as her extremely wide operatic repertoire, Caballé gave numerous recitals, often of Catalan and Spanish songs. In the late 1980s, she performed in the famous Barcelona concert with the rock singer Freddie Mercury, and she sang at the opening ceremony of the Barcelona Olympics in 1992.

Caballé earned a reputation for awkwardness which rivalled that of Callas. She had strong views on how certain operas should be played, and refused to compromise on standards. In 1973 she got her way after a major row on the performance of Bellini’s Norma at La Scala, which proved to be one of her major successes. Possibly the biggest scandal of her career also came at La Scala in 1982. She was to play the leading role in a revival production of the 1957 version of Donizetti’s Anna Bolena, which Visconti had prepared for Callas. The famous curse of Callas seemed to strike when Caballé failed to sing at the first night performance because of illness. However, the audience were not told of the illness until they were in their seats, and a near riot ensued. Caballé eventually performed the role ten days later, and, typically, won over her initially hostile audience. She repeated the role in a special performance staged for ITV’s South Bank Show in 1993 at the Tower of London.

DAVID GEORGE


cafeterías

Spanish cafeterías trade primarily in the snack market, providing coffee-break style catering from breakfast to dinner-time. Although alcoholic beverages can be purchased, most of their sales are coffees, pastries, sandwiches and tapas. They are busy practically all day, serving breakfast, elevenses, aperitifs, after-lunch coffee, merienda and pre-dinner drinks. Originally, they evolved from the traditional café, but their decor reflects a faster, more functional and ‘modern’ approach to customer service. Cafetería prices are slightly higher than in bars and there is an official ratings system which determines prices within three categories; establishments are also allowed to charge more for table or terrace service.

RAMÓN PARRONDO


Caixa, La

La Caixa, or Caja de Ahorros y Pensiones de Barcelona, dates from 1844. In 1990 it merged

-70-

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction x
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Structure xiii
  • Architecture xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 7
  • Further Reading 11
  • Further Reading 29
  • Further Reading 37
  • Further Reading 41
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 47
  • Further Reading 65
  • C 70
  • Further Reading 81
  • Further Reading 93
  • Further Reading 100
  • Further Reading 113
  • Further Reading 128
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 136
  • Further Reading 140
  • E 152
  • Further Reading 155
  • Further Reading 166
  • Further Reading 171
  • F 173
  • Further Reading 185
  • Further Reading 206
  • G 213
  • Further Reading 227
  • Further Reading 229
  • Further Reading 231
  • Further Reading 242
  • H 245
  • I 261
  • Further Reading 266
  • J 276
  • Further Reading 280
  • K 283
  • L 285
  • Further Reading 292
  • M 313
  • Further Reading 332
  • Further Reading 335
  • N 359
  • Further Reading 362
  • Further Reading 365
  • O 376
  • P 384
  • Further Reading 429
  • Q 430
  • R 433
  • Further Reading 435
  • Further Reading 436
  • Further Reading 439
  • Further Reading 443
  • References 452
  • S 464
  • Further Reading 471
  • Further Reading 475
  • T 502
  • Further Reading 508
  • Further Reading 509
  • U 526
  • Further Reading 536
  • V 537
  • Further Reading 538
  • Further Reading 539
  • Further Reading 544
  • W 545
  • X 550
  • Y 552
  • Further Reading 553
  • Z 554
  • Index 557
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