Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture

By Eamonn Rodgers; Valerie Rodgers | Go to book overview

R

Rabal, Francisco

b. 1925, Aguilas (Murcia)

Film actor

After a series of films in the 1950s, including Luna de sangre (Blood Moon) (1950), Murió hace quince años (He Died Fifteen Years Ago) (1954) and Prisionero del mar (Prisoner of the Sea) (1957), it was his appearances in Buñuel’s Nazarín (1958), Viridiana (1961) and Belle de jour (1966) which brought Rabal international recognition. In the 1960s and 1970s he also worked with such directors as Carlos Saura, in Llanto par un bandido (Lament for a Bandit) (1963), and Camino, in Las largas vacaciones de 1936 (The Long Holidays of 1936) (1976). His films of the 1980s and 1990s include Camus’ La colmena (The Hive) (1982) and his Los santos inocentes (The Holy Innocents) (1984) in which Rabal played the half-mad uncle, a role for which he shared a prize for best actor with Alfredo Landa, and won the National Cinematography Prize; Patino’s Los paraísos perdidos (Lost Paradises) (1985), in which he played an ageing intellectual; García Sánchez’s Divinas palabras (Divine Words) (1987); Almodó-var’s ¡Atame! (Tie Me Up, Tie Me Down!) (1989); L’autre (The Other) (1991) and El hombre que perdió su sombrero (The Man Who Lost His Hat) (1991). In 1984 he was best male actor at the Cannes Film Festival, and in 1991 he won prizes as best actor in Montreal and Gijón. In 1994 he published his memoirs under the title Si yo te contara (If I Told You).

See also: film and cinema

EAMONN RODGERS


racism

Spain has arguably a less severe problem of racism than other European countries, which may be due to the relatively lower proportion of immigrants. Nevertheless, there is a traditional antagonism towards gypsies on the part of the settled community, despite the fact that these nomadic groups have been in Spain for at least five hundred years, and have enriched popular culture with, for example, flamenco music and dance. Plans by town councils to provide fixed accommodation for gypsy communities have on occasion provoked opposition from residents, intensifying the tendency for gypsies to concentrate in shanty towns near big cities, where they are forced to live in very unfavourable conditions. Intermarriage between the gypsy and settled communities (the payos, as the gypsies call them) is rare, which perpetuates the mutual feeling of separateness and impedes the breaking-down of prejudice on both sides. In an effort to discourage stereotyping, voluntary organizations, and government agencies such as the Youth Institute of the Ministry of Social Affairs, have mounted advertising campaigns on television to outlaw the use of words like gitano as a term of abuse or mockery.

Prejudice against gypsies is probably the only major area in which community attitudes continue to have primarily an ethnic or cultural base. It is true that historically antagonism towards Muslims and Jews on religious grounds was deep-rooted, and traces of this remain. Apart from gypsies, however, hostility towards particular groups tends to be primarily economic in origin. Since the early

-433-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction x
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Structure xiii
  • Architecture xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 7
  • Further Reading 11
  • Further Reading 29
  • Further Reading 37
  • Further Reading 41
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 47
  • Further Reading 65
  • C 70
  • Further Reading 81
  • Further Reading 93
  • Further Reading 100
  • Further Reading 113
  • Further Reading 128
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 136
  • Further Reading 140
  • E 152
  • Further Reading 155
  • Further Reading 166
  • Further Reading 171
  • F 173
  • Further Reading 185
  • Further Reading 206
  • G 213
  • Further Reading 227
  • Further Reading 229
  • Further Reading 231
  • Further Reading 242
  • H 245
  • I 261
  • Further Reading 266
  • J 276
  • Further Reading 280
  • K 283
  • L 285
  • Further Reading 292
  • M 313
  • Further Reading 332
  • Further Reading 335
  • N 359
  • Further Reading 362
  • Further Reading 365
  • O 376
  • P 384
  • Further Reading 429
  • Q 430
  • R 433
  • Further Reading 435
  • Further Reading 436
  • Further Reading 439
  • Further Reading 443
  • References 452
  • S 464
  • Further Reading 471
  • Further Reading 475
  • T 502
  • Further Reading 508
  • Further Reading 509
  • U 526
  • Further Reading 536
  • V 537
  • Further Reading 538
  • Further Reading 539
  • Further Reading 544
  • W 545
  • X 550
  • Y 552
  • Further Reading 553
  • Z 554
  • Index 557
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 594

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.