Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture

By Eamonn Rodgers; Valerie Rodgers | Go to book overview

this had been abandoned by the government. Once crossed, he proved a tenacious foe, maintaining links with CC OO, and continuously pressing the government to pursue more pro-labour policies. He was able to marginalize pro-government voices in the UGT itself, and is not without friends within the PSOE. In 1993 he retired as general secretary of the UGT to be replaced by his protégé, Cándido Méndez.


Further reading

g
Gillespie, R. (1989) The Spanish Socialist Party: A History of Factionalism, Oxford: Clarendon Press (the most detailed history of the Spanish socialist movement between 1939 and 1982).
Guindal, M. and Serrano, R. (1986) La otra transición: Nicolás Redondo: el sindicalismo socialista, Madrid: Union Editorial (the only biography of Nicolas Redondo).

ANGEL SMITH


regional cooking

Spanish cooking enjoys a marked regional character although, as in other Mediterranean countries, certain staple ingredients such as olive oil, flat-leafed parsley, garlic, tomatoes, onions, lemons and wine, are found in most Spanish kitchens. Spain’s very diverse history, geography and climate, have all contributed to her culinary heritage. Paella, one of the country’s national dishes, would not be what it is without the saffron, introduced into Spain by the Phoenicians, the oil and fruit of the olive trees planted by the Greeks and extended by the Romans, and short-grain rice and lemons brought by the Arabs. Also, chickpeas used in the traditional stew cocido owe their appearance in Spain to the Carthaginians.

Cocido is a dish which, with slight variations, can be found in all corners of the peninsula. Cocido, olla, pote or escudella as it is variously known has its roots in the olla podrida, or rotten pot mentioned in Don Quijote, and was a Christian adaptation of the ancient Jewish dish adafina, in which the hard boiled eggs of the latter were replaced by pork. Cocido consists of meat, sausages, pulses and vegetables—whatever is typical locally. It is usually served in three courses: first the soup, consisting of the strained broth, then the vegetables and pulses, and finally the meat. Chickpeas are generally used in the stews from the areas of Madrid and Andalusia, while alubias (white beans) are preferred in the north, the Galician pote gallego invariably contains turnips, and the Asturian fabada uses local beans called fabes.

The cuisines of the northern coastal regions display an abundance of fish and shellfish, and the meat from this area, which has year round green pasture, is of good quality. Galicia is renowned for its empanadas (meat and fish pies), and lacón con grelos (salted ham with turnip tops), often cooked with sausage and potatoes called cachelos, which give the dish a slightly bitter taste. Specialities include nécoras (small orange crabs), and scallops, usually baked and served in the shell—the emblem worn by pilgrims who visited the shrine of St James in Compostela. Fish and shellfish are combined in the Asturian caldereta (casserole), or served independently, usually accompanied by corn bread and cider—the national drink of Asturias. Salmon and the veined cheese, cabrales, are other local favour-ites. A speciality of the Santander area of Cantabria is rice and salmon cooked in milk, and a plate of anchovies in a rich egg and butter sauce is highly regarded. The Basque country is famed for the excellence of its cuisine and gastronomic societies flourish. Food here is generally uncompli-cated and subtly flavoured. The region has many great dishes such as hake Vizcaya style, or bacalao al pil-pil (cod cooked with oil, garlic and a little chilli pepper). Baby eel and marmitako (tuna and potato stew) are also of note.

Aragon, Navarre and Rioja are all watered by the Ebro, Spain’s longest river. Trout is plentiful here and that from Pyrenees rivers is excellent, either soaked in wine, stuffed with ham and baked Navarre style, or simply fried. A notable feature of the Ebro Valley area is chilindrón sauce, made with tomatoes, garlic, onions, cured ham and red peppers, in which meat is cooked, particularly chicken and rabbit. Other specialities are partridge in chocolate sauce, and quail cooked in fig leaves.

Catalonia is renowned for its sauces such as ali-oli (garlic mayonnaise), romescu (red pepper and almond sauce) and samfaina (a mixture of tomatoes,

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Encyclopedia of Contemporary Spanish Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction x
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Structure xiii
  • Architecture xiv
  • A 1
  • Further Reading 7
  • Further Reading 11
  • Further Reading 29
  • Further Reading 37
  • Further Reading 41
  • B 44
  • Further Reading 47
  • Further Reading 65
  • C 70
  • Further Reading 81
  • Further Reading 93
  • Further Reading 100
  • Further Reading 113
  • Further Reading 128
  • D 135
  • Further Reading 136
  • Further Reading 140
  • E 152
  • Further Reading 155
  • Further Reading 166
  • Further Reading 171
  • F 173
  • Further Reading 185
  • Further Reading 206
  • G 213
  • Further Reading 227
  • Further Reading 229
  • Further Reading 231
  • Further Reading 242
  • H 245
  • I 261
  • Further Reading 266
  • J 276
  • Further Reading 280
  • K 283
  • L 285
  • Further Reading 292
  • M 313
  • Further Reading 332
  • Further Reading 335
  • N 359
  • Further Reading 362
  • Further Reading 365
  • O 376
  • P 384
  • Further Reading 429
  • Q 430
  • R 433
  • Further Reading 435
  • Further Reading 436
  • Further Reading 439
  • Further Reading 443
  • References 452
  • S 464
  • Further Reading 471
  • Further Reading 475
  • T 502
  • Further Reading 508
  • Further Reading 509
  • U 526
  • Further Reading 536
  • V 537
  • Further Reading 538
  • Further Reading 539
  • Further Reading 544
  • W 545
  • X 550
  • Y 552
  • Further Reading 553
  • Z 554
  • Index 557
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