Higher Education through Open and Distance Learning

By Keith Harry | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

Open and distance learning for the new society

Keith Harry and Hilary Perraton

A generation ago, higher education was one of the fastest growing industries in Britain, along with electronics and newly discovered natural gas. Over the last decade, in many countries but by no means all, higher education has been growing more rapidly than ever, faster than the economies that support it. Open and distance learning has been part of that expansion; today, in industrialised and developing countries alike, enrolments at a distance form between 5 and 15 per cent of the total in many cases, over 25 per cent in a few. The purpose of this book is to report on that expansion, examining the ways in which open and distance learning for higher education has responded to the needs of the new society, and summarising the lessons of recent practice for policy-makers and educators. It is just that, a report: not a catalogue (where the International Centre for Distance Learning has a good one on-line) nor a recipe book (of which there are plenty) nor an academic critique (of which there are a few) but a review from which others can draw conclusions to guide practice.

It has been a turbulent decade, whose turbulence is reflected in its educational history. The collapse of communism brought a necessary reshaping to higher education in eastern Europe. The end of apartheid illuminated the need for South African education to catch up with the outside world, in its institutions as well as its philosophy. The new legitimacy given to private-sector activities in the 1980s is still washing over education. Changes in technology have been more rapid than we remember—few of us used faxes fifteen years ago—and may yet reshape education. Technological change and the forces of globalisation are dissolving frontiers in education, as they already have in culture. Open and distance learning has been influenced, along with the rest of society, by all these changes which are tracked, thematically in the first half of this book, and geographically in the second half.

Higher education has always had a symbiotic relationship with its host community and that community has always extended beyond the walls of the city or the nation. Dusty-footed wandering scholars were the precursors of the internationally mobile students, discussed in chapter 2, whose

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Higher Education through Open and Distance Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.