American Theater of the 1960s

By Zoltán Szilassy | Go to book overview

1
Edward Albee: First among Equals

I WISH TO AVOID RESPONDING to the critics' and the critics' critics' opinions here in this chapter.1 As I read plays by Edward Albee or saw them performed on stage, they always had such a strong impact on me that I felt like an East European McMurphy under the treatment of a severe yet humanistic American nurse. Otherwise, I could dedicate a chapter to Albee in my literary autobiography the way Richard Kostelanetz does in his Recyclings: "edward clearly most substantial several american who come in last years...expect albee 36 continue time write of excellence...it hard first define ultimate in single themes diverse subjects [but!] trace lines style sensibility."2And so on, just as I firmly share Albee's "ceterum censeo" in the case of New Carthago; with due alteration in details, I envisage him not sitting, but dancing macabre -- a new Marius -- on the ruins of the American Dream.

Albee's private life has never interested me, especially in the sense that omniscient critics are likely to view his output. I see eye to eye with Pierre Brodin who, after

-11-

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