Personality at Work: The Role of Individual Differences in the Workplace

By Adrian Furnham | Go to book overview

Preface

My primary interest in the topic of this book arose from two quite different experiences: the one ‘applied’, the other ‘academic’.

My applied experience was the result of being called in as a consultant to a number of organizations interested in applying psychological principles and research findings to such things as recruitment, training and selection. It is not always easy for an academic to be faced by the questions of ‘real-world professionals’, who require, it seems, certain, succinct and immediate answers to complicated questions. Academics are trained to be cautious; their theories and findings are filled with caveats and warnings about over-generalization and over-simplification. The words ‘towards’, ‘perhaps’ and ‘notwithstanding’ pepper their writings, and the gestation period for theories, experiments and reports is fairly lengthy. They are primarily interested in getting the theory right; in replicating results; in designing and executing elegant experiments to disprove (or provide evidence for) hypotheses; and attempt to expound strong, powerful yet parsimonious theories.

Despite its undoubted progress this century, academic psychology is no match for the ‘hard’, ‘pure’ sciences like physics or even the applied discipline of medicine. Whatever the reason for this comparative lack of progress (and very many have been advanced), academic psychologists are therefore cautious and conservative about psychological findings and knowledge. Some laws, models and theories exist, but are highly specific. Other well-known, replicated (and occasionally counter-intuitive) findings have trickled down into ‘common sense’ and hence seem less interesting. But there are numerous grand, even imperialistic, theories in psychology that purport to give an accurate, complete, veridical (and radical) insight into the whole working of the human psyche. Like other grand theories (e.g. communism or catholicism), there are psychological theories that can ‘explain’ practically everything. Unfortunately, it is these grand theories which often invoke difficult and ambiguous concepts like the unconscious

-xviii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Personality at Work: The Role of Individual Differences in the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.