Personality at Work: The Role of Individual Differences in the Workplace

By Adrian Furnham | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

Personality and work satisfaction

One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important.

Bertrand Russell

Business is a combination of war and sport.

A. Maureis

Men of genius do not excel in any profession because they labour in it, but they labour in it because they excel.

W. Haslitt

It seems a pity that psychology should have destroyed all our knowledge of human nature.

G.K. Chesterton


6.1 INTRODUCTION

Are some personality types more likely to be job satisfied than others regardless of the job? What sort of people are most satisfied in what sorts of jobs? Are job-satisfied individuals more productive than less satisfied individuals? Is job satisfaction a consequence, rather than a cause of, productivity at work? There are a number of important questions one may wish to ask of the literature on job satisfaction. Although there is a plethora of studies and available measures of job satisfaction, there is surprisingly little data on the role of individual differences in job satisfaction. Various demographic factors have been researched, such as age, sex and occupational status, but there are very few studies that for good theoretical or methodological reasons have included personality measures.

It seems completely self-evident that there should be major individual differences in job satisfaction. It is obvious that different people in the same job experience different sources and amounts of satisfaction, while

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