Personality at Work: The Role of Individual Differences in the Workplace

By Adrian Furnham | Go to book overview

Chapter 10

Implications for selection, training and reward structure

If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.

D. Bok

Never learn to do anything. If you don’t learn, you will always find someone else to do it for you.

Mark Twain

If you have great talents, industry will improve them: if you have but moderate abilities, industries will supply their deficiency.

Joshua Reynold

Management is now where the medical profession was when it decided that working in a drug store was not sufficient training to become a doctor.

L.A. Appley

Training is everything. The peach was once a bitter almond; cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education.

Mark Twain

Personally I’m always ready to learn, although I do not always like being taught.

Winston Churchill


10.1 INTRODUCTION

If it is the case that personality and other individual difference variables are correlated with a whole range of job-related beliefs and behaviours, it makes sense that these factors should be taken into consideration in selection, training and rewarding personnel. As regards selection, what is clearly important is that the most able, capable and organizationally compatible individuals are selected. Where necessary, these individuals have to be trained to reach a minimum level of competence. Good employees, then, need to be retained by equitable and appealing reward

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