The Afterlife of Property: Domestic Security and the Victorian Novel

By Jeff Nunokawa | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION
1
E. J. Hobsbawm, The Age of Capital: 1848–1875 (New York: New American Library, 1975, 1979). Subsequent citations of Hobsbawm refer to this edition.
2
See, for example, Karl Marx, Capital, vol. 1, trans. Ben Fowkes (1867; reprint, New York: Vintage Books, 1977); Immanuel Wallerstein, Historical Capitalism (London: Verso, 1983).
3
This is the period generally characterized as the industrial phase of capitalism, which saw the exponential expansion of capital-labor relations and the successful struggles of laissez-faire partisans to end state regulation of markets (the repeal of the Corn Laws and Navigation Acts). See Hobsbawm, The Age of Capital; Asa Briggs, The Age of Improvement 1783–1867 (London: Longmans, Green, 1959); David Thomson, England in the Nineteenth Century, 1815–1914 (New York: Penguin Books, 1950, 1978); Marx, Capital.
4
Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, ed. Edwin Mims (1843; reprint, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1918), 196.
5
Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, Baron, England and the English (New York: J. & J. Harper, 1833), 1:86.
6
Wallerstein, Historical Capitalism, 10.
7
See, for example, Karl Marx, The German Ideology, ed. C. J. Arthur (New York: International Publishers, 1970); Georg Lukács, History and Class Consciousness: Studies in Marxist Dialectics, trans. Rodney Livingstone (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1971), 83–222; Theodor W. Adorno, Prisms, trans. Samuel Weber and Shirley Weber (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1981); Frederic Jameson, The Political Unconscious (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1981).
8
William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, (1847–48; reprint, New York: Oxford University Press, 1983), 201. All subsequent citations of Vanity Fair refer to this edition.
9
Barbara Lee Smith Bodichon, A Brief Summary in Plain English of the Most Important Laws of England Concerning Women (London, 1854).
10
The shock induced by the female commodity is a perennial one; for a compact summary of ancient, medieval, and modern apprehensions of this figure, see Catherine Gallagher, “George Eliot and Daniel Deronda: The Prostitute and the Jewish Question,” in Sex, Politics and Science in the NineteenthCentury Novel: Selected Papers from the English Institute 1983–1984, ed. Ruth Bernard Yeazell (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1986), 39–62.

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