English Lyric Poetry: The Early Seventeenth Century

By Jonathan F. S. Post | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Literary histories are supposed to be things of the past. This is especially true of histories of poetry—that most literary of genres—and truer still of poetry of the distant past, like the lyric poetry of the early seventeenth century: the subject of this book. What more can be said? And need anything more be said about Herrick or Donne when there is so much to say today about their “culture”? And to whom is one to speak? To other specialists? To people seeking to enter the profession? To university or college students? To readers who want to know more about poetry in general? To readers and practitioners of contemporary verse who feel the need, say, to know something about Herbert if they wish to understand that most nuanced of his many descendants, Elizabeth Bishop? I raise these as concerns at the outset because they are part of the present climate of literary studies and, tonally at least, are one way of differentiating the present inquiry from previous literary histories and the judgments they contain. But I raise them as questions since the purpose of this study is not to produce another lament that literature has been kidnapped for “other” purposes, but to indicate a belief that, partly in response to the scholarly and critical work produced during the last two decades, the poetry of the earlier seventeenth century—an awkward period designation if there ever was one—continues to be immensely rewarding for those who wish to read not only between the lines but the lines themselves, and who prefer individual poets to overarching themes and genres.

In making this claim, I plead guilty in advance to enjoying thoroughly much of the verse of the period. I would rather have written a line by Marvell than by Marx; and a few poems by Herbert are worth many late nights with Calvin. Of course there is no reason, except for time, to read exclusively, and the appearance in these pages of John Taylor, the Water Poet, serves as a warning that not every bit of verse in the seventeenth century was written with a Jonsonian design to escape the ages. And yet Taylor is such an odd duck, publishing his Works (numbering “three and sixty”) halfway through his literary life, that it’s difficult to refuse him notice for a lifetime of versifying. I do not mean to sound flippant about matters of inclusion or exclusion, although scholars have sometimes been too heated or solemn on this subject. (I regret, rather than applaud,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
English Lyric Poetry: The Early Seventeenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • A Note on Sources and Spelling xvii
  • 1 - Irremediably Donne 1
  • 2 - Ben Jonson and the Art of Inclusion 23
  • 3 - Patriotic and Popular Poets 54
  • 4 - Caroline Amusements 91
  • 5 - Substance and Style in George Herbert’s the Temple 135
  • 6 - The Once and Future Poet 156
  • 7 - Arenas of Retreat 190
  • 8 - From Wroth to Philips 210
  • 9 - Andrew Marvell 253
  • Notes 287
  • Index 310
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.