English Lyric Poetry: The Early Seventeenth Century

By Jonathan F. S. Post | Go to book overview

NOTES

FOREWORD
1
See, for instance, The Penguin Book of Renaissance Verse, 1509-1659, ed. David Norbrook and H.R. Woudhuysen, Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1993.
2
Vendler, Soul Says: On Recent Poetry, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1995, p. 3. The other remarks by Vendler woven into the next paragraph are taken from her brief introduction.
3
Heaney, The Redress of Poetry: Oxford Lectures, London: Faber and Faber, 1995, p. 8.

1

IRREMEDIABLY DONNE

1
Quoted from R.C. Bald, John Donne: A Life, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1970, p. 139. The attribution of the quotation is questionable but has recently been assigned to Donne by Ernest W. Sullivan, II, “Donne’s Epithalamium for Anne” in John Donne’s “desire of more”: The Subject of Anne More Donne in His Poetry, ed. M. Thomas Hester, Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, 1996, pp. 35-8.
2
Bald, p. 134; spelling largely modernized. See also Dennis Flynn, John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1995, ch. 5.
3
Ben Jonson, ed. Ian Donaldson, New York: Oxford University Press, 1985, p. 597.
4
John Donne: The Epithalamions, Anniversaries, and Epicedes, ed. W. Milgate, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978, p. 81. “Prince of wits” comes from “In Memory of Doctor Donne,” attributed to Richard Busby (p. 97).
5
North, from A Forest of Varieties: or Rather a Wyldernesse Concerning Petty Poetry, in Literary Criticism of Seventeenth-Century England, ed. Edward W. Taylor, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1967, pp. 159-60.
6
Carey, John Donne: Life, Mind and Art, London: Faber & Faber, 1981, pp. 121-2.
7
See North’s remarks “Concerning Petty Poetry” in Taylor, Literary Criticism of Seventeenth-Century England, p. 162: “I may be crabbed and rugged, but will never affect to bee so, especially in verses, whose true nature and use is to worke a kind of a Charme upon the mind, even with slightnesse of matter, by the well wrought and exquisite harmony of their Cadence, and sound.”
8
“Life of Cowley” in Samuel Johnson: Selected Poetry and Prose, ed. Frank Brady and W.K. Wimsatt, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1977, pp. 347-8.
9
The Poems of Thomas Carew, ed. Rhodes Dunlap, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1949, pp. 72-3.
10
Dennis Flynn, “Donne’s First Portrait: Some Biographical Clues?” Bulletin of Research in the Humanities 82 (1979):7-17. See also Flynn, John Donne and the Ancient Catholic Nobility, ch. 8.
11
Walton’s Lives, ed. A.H. Bullen, London: George Bell & Sons, 1884, p. 54.

-287-

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English Lyric Poetry: The Early Seventeenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • A Note on Sources and Spelling xvii
  • 1 - Irremediably Donne 1
  • 2 - Ben Jonson and the Art of Inclusion 23
  • 3 - Patriotic and Popular Poets 54
  • 4 - Caroline Amusements 91
  • 5 - Substance and Style in George Herbert’s the Temple 135
  • 6 - The Once and Future Poet 156
  • 7 - Arenas of Retreat 190
  • 8 - From Wroth to Philips 210
  • 9 - Andrew Marvell 253
  • Notes 287
  • Index 310
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