Women and the Law in the Roman Empire: A Sourcebook on Marriage, Divorce and Widowhood

By Judith Evans Grubbs | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book has been more than five years in the making, and has been helped along by many individuals and institutions. The idea for a sourcebook on women and the law in the Roman Empire first occurred to me while I was a Jessie Ball Dupont Fellow at the National Humanities Center in 1993-4, completing my book on Constantine’s marriage legislation and beginning a project on the rescripts in the Code of Justinian. Though I was then working on quite different projects, the work I did at the NHC certainly contributed to the completion of this book. I am especially grateful to the National Endowment for the Humanities, for its generosity granting me a Fellowship for College Teachers, which made it possible for me to take a leave from teaching in fall 1997 to work on this sourcebook. Finally, a sabbatical leave in 2000 provided by Sweet Briar College enabled me to complete a draft of almost all of the book.

This book includes not only selections from Roman law, but also from epigraphical and papyrological sources, areas of classical studies in which I have little expertise and experience. Fortunately I was able to take a few steps toward remedying these deficiencies by attending two summer programs. The first was an NEH Summer Seminar held in 1995 at the American Academy in Rome on “Death and Commemoration in ancient Rome” led by John Bodel and Richard Saller, and the second was the International Summer School in Papyrology held at Christ Church College, Oxford in July 1997, under the direction of Dirk Obbink. I would like to express my appreciation to the NEH and to Sweet Briar College’s Faculty Grants Committee for making my participation in these programs possible.

Most importantly, I have benefited from the advice and suggestions of colleagues who read various pieces of this book in draft, answered my queries, and corrected errors in my interpretation of the sources. My greatest debt is to Antti Arjava and Susan Treggiari, who both read multiple drafts of all the chapters, and helped me to narrow the focus and refine the organi-zation of the whole book. Tolly Boatwright read a very early draft of Chapter 1, and offered her considerable expertise in matters epigraphical. Tom

-xxiii-

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Women and the Law in the Roman Empire: A Sourcebook on Marriage, Divorce and Widowhood
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Glossary of Latin Legal Terms xvii
  • Acknowledgements xxiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Status of Women in Roman Law 16
  • 2 - Marriage in Roman Law and Society 81
  • 3 - Prohibited and Non-Legal Unions 136
  • 4 - Divorce and Its Consequences 187
  • 5 - Widows and Their Children 219
  • Summation the Condition of Women: Rights and Restrictions 270
  • Bibliography 327
  • Index of Sources 337
  • General Index 343
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