Basics of Environmental Science

By Michael Allaby | Go to book overview

Glossary

a
adaptation The process by which species adapt evolutionarily (i.e. acquire adaptedness).
adaptedness The condition of a species that is adapted to the conditions under which it lives.
adiabatic (adj.) Without exchanging energy with the surrounding medium. Applied to a change in air temperature occurring solely as a consequence of the air rising (and cooling) or descending (and warming).
aeolian Wind-blown.
aeroplankton Spores and other microscopic organic particles and organisms that drift in the air because they weigh so little that they fall only slowly and are likely to be carried aloft again by rising air currents before settling on a surface.
aerosol A colloid, in which particles are dispersed in a gas, usually air. Because of their small size (0.01-10 µm), airborne aerosols fall very slowly.
aggressive mimicry The resemblance of a predatory or parasitic species to its prey or host.
albedo A measure of the amount of radiation a non-luminous body reflects.
Allen’s rule A rule, proposed by J.A. Allen, stating that projecting parts of the body of mammals (ears, muzzle, and tail) tend to be larger in animals living in warm climates than in closely related animals living in cold climates.
allogenic (adj.) Applied to an ecological succession driven by abiotic environmental changes.
alluvial Formed from sediment deposited by a river.
amino acid One of the constituent units of a protein, comprising an amino group (NH2) and carboxyl group (COOH) both attached to the same carbon atom. Of more than 80 naturally occurring amino acids, about 20 are commonly found in proteins.
anion A negatively charged ion.
aphelion The point at which an orbiting body is furthest from the body it orbits.
aquifer A body of permeable material below ground through which water flows.
autogenic (adj.) Applied to an ecological succession driven by environmental changes induced by vegetation.
autotroph An organism that can synthesize the organic compounds it needs for nourishment from simple, inorganic molecules.

b
Batesian mimicry The close resemblance between a species that is palatable to predators and an unrelated species that is unpalatable, leading predators to avoid both. It was first observed by H.W. Bates.
Bergmann’s rule A rule, proposed by C. Bergmann, stating that animals living in cold regions are larger than closely related animals living in warm regions.

-300-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Basics of Environmental Science
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Tables xi
  • Preface to the Second Edition xiii
  • How to Use This Book xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Earth Sciences 19
  • 3 - Physical Resources 90
  • 4 - Biosphere 137
  • 5 - Biological Resources 200
  • References 258
  • 6 - Environmental Management 261
  • Further Reading 296
  • Glossary 300
  • Bibliography 307
  • Index 316
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.