The Sociology of Sport and Physical Education: An Introductory Reader

By Anthony Laker | Go to book overview

3

Methodological issues in research

Matthew Curtner-Smith

Introduction

The main aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the methods employed by those who do sport pedagogy research. This research includes studies of physical education teaching and coaching, physical education teacher and coach education, physical education teachers and coaches, pupils in physical education programmes and those who participate in sport and physical activity, and physical education and coaching curricula. Additional goals for this chapter are to outline some of the major research findings from this body of work and to provide examples of specific types of research. Despite these aims, readers should be aware that this chapter does not include an exhaustive literature review or even an extensive review of research methods. Rather, it is intended as a starting point for those who are new to the research process and to help promote understanding of the chapters which follow in the rest of this book.

Paradigms for sport pedagogy research

To date, researchers of sport pedagogy have operated within one of three paradigms: the positivist paradigm, the interpretive paradigm, and the critical paradigm. Each of these paradigms provides a different lens for viewing and understanding the world of human activity (Sparkes, 1994a). Not surprisingly then, researchers working within each paradigm seek to answer different types of questions about physical education and sport. Moreover, they often employ different methods for gathering information (data collection) and making sense of this information (data analysis), the two processes which they hope will allow them to arrive at answers to their questions. In the following three sections, I will describe the main goals of those working within the positivist, interpretive, and critical paradigms as well as the methods by which they collect and analyse data. In each section specific examples of recently conducted studies will be provided and some of the main contributions made to the field by researchers working within each paradigm will be described.

-36-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sociology of Sport and Physical Education: An Introductory Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.