Achieving Competence, Success, and Excellence in Teaching

By Mark Brundrett; Peter Silcock | Go to book overview

6

Co-constructive teaching

A practical guide

Introduction

Working out, in more detail, how teachers can teach co-constructively clarifies a model tailor-made for modern classrooms at primary, secondary and advanced levels. Given that no teaching approach is without weaknesses, in-depth analysis might also turn up ways of dealing with these. So this chapter contains a reasonably full guide to that form of teaching underwriting partnership approaches. Its eleven sections discuss: reasons why co-constructive teaching is given special treatment; the sorts of value-commitments teachers will make; the nature of conceptual content co-constructive strategies teach; methods and techniques used; professional skills deployed; how to keep social order within co-constructed curricula; modes of assessment and evaluation; age-phase differences; the variable roles of pupils and teachers; dealing practically with endemic problems and, finally, a summary of guidelines determining quality practice (competence, success, excellence), preparing for later chapters.


Why choose co-constructive teaching?

As introduced, co-constructive teaching is the operational arm of any partnership approach. Its likely classroom effectiveness is promoted for four main reasons, gleaned from earlier chapters.

First, the English/Welsh National Curriculum is ‘heavy’ with content (suited to many vested interests). It can become fatally unmanageable, unless teachers route themselves through it. Mapping out curricular programmes via democratic negotiations would appear a valid way of responding to legislated demands.

Second, ‘partnership’ approaches are popular in today’s schools— usually involving whole-school policies, parents, higher education tutors

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Achieving Competence, Success, and Excellence in Teaching
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - The Study of Teaching 1
  • 2 - What is Good Teaching? 14
  • 3 - Models of Good Practice 1 30
  • 4 - Models of Good Practice 2 50
  • 5 - Models of Good Practice 3 66
  • 6 - Co-Constructive Teaching 84
  • 7 - Achieving Competence 101
  • 8 - Achieving Success 115
  • 9 - Achieving Excellence 129
  • 10 - The Myths, Mysteries and Magic of Good Teaching 145
  • References 158
  • Index 177
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