BIBLIOGRAPHY
WHEN the English edition of Feudal Society was in preparation, we had to consider what was to be done with the bibliography, which was compiled in 1938-9. One of two courses seemed open to us: either to attempt to bring it up to date by the inclusion of more recent material, or to print it as it stood, with a supplementary list of titles. There was a strong argument against the first of these alternatives. Bloch’s bibliography is a work of personal selection and classification, intended to serve not only as a guide for students, but also as an acknowledgement of his debt to other scholars.1 To have introduced additional titles into this framework would have been, it seemed to us, an unwarranted interference with Bloch’s design, especially as he had made it a principle not to include works of which he had no personal knowledge. We have therefore adopted the second course and reproduced his bibliography as he left it, with the omission of one section only: a list of general histories, the majority of which, we believed, would already be familiar to students of medieval history. A supplement lists more recent publications.2Although this book is based on a profound study of original sources, many of which are referred to in the footnotes, the author in his bibliography has confined himself to listing the standard guides to such material except in the case of the legal sources, which he has enumerated separately. Again, for the intellectual and social ‘climate’ which he has discussed from a particular point of view in Part II, his list of secondary authorities is limited to a few special questions. The bibliography is much fuller, however, on the subject of the last invasions and, as might be expected, on the special aspects of social and political development which form the central theme of the book. Except where otherwise indicated, the place of publication is Paris for a book in French, or London for a book in English. L.A. Manyon
PLAN OF BIBLIOGRAPHY
I THE EVIDENCE

(1) Standard Guides to Sources.3 (2) The Linguistic Evidence. (3) Historiography. (4) The Literary Evidence.

II MENTAL ATTITUDES

(1) Modes of Feeling and Thought. (2) ‘Terrors’ of the Year 1000.

III THE LAST INVASIONS

(1) General. (2) The Saracens in the Alps and the Italian Peninsula. (3) The Hungarians. (4) The Scandinavians. (5) The Conversion of the North. (6) Effects of the Scandinavian Invasions.

IV LEGAL AND POLITICAL STRUCTURE

(1) Original Sources. (2) Modern Works on the History of Law and Institutions. (3) The Legal Mind and the Teaching of Law. (4) Political Ideas.

V TIES OF KINSHIP

(1) The Family and the Vendetta. (2) Economic Solidarity.

VI FEUDAL INSTITUTIONS PROPER

(1) Feudalism in General; Frankish Origins. (2) Feudalism by Countries and Regions. (3) ‘Companionage’, Vassalage and Homage. (4) Precaria, ‘Benefit’, Fief, and Allod. (5) The Law of the Fief. (6) Plurality of Lords and Liege Homage.

1 See p. xxi, n.

2 Pp. 478-81.

3 Excluding literary sources in the vernacular.

-453-

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