John Donne: The Critical Heritage

By Barry Maine | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I should like to express my gratitude to my Wake Forest colleagues, William Moss and James Hans, for their technical assistance, and to Townsend Ludington for generously agreeing to read a draft of the Introduction.

It has not always proved possible to locate the owners of copyright material. However, all possible care has been taken to trace ownership of the selections printed and to make full acknowledgment for their use. For permission to reprint, thanks are due to the following: Edgar M. Branch and Cleo Paturis as representatives of the Estate of James T. Farrell for No. 50, reprinted by permission of the archives of James T. Farrell at the University of Pennsylvania; the Chicago Tribune Company for Nos 7, 18, and 60 (Copyrighted, Chicago Tribune Company, all rights reserved, used with permission); Condé Nast Publications Inc. for No. 1, courtesy Vanity Fair (Copyright © 1921 (renewed) 1949, 1977, by The Condé Nast Publications Inc.); Malcolm Cowley for Nos 34 and 46; Daily Mail (London) for No. 27; Editions Gallimard for No. 42, from Situations I by Jean-Paul Sartre (© Editions Gallimard 1947); Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Inc., and Routledge & Kegan Paul, Ltd, for Nos 49, 55, and 57, from Edmond Wilson, Letters on Literature and Politics 1912-1972, selected and edited by Elena Wilson (Copyright © 1957, 1973, 1974, 1977 by Elena Wilson. Reprinted by permission); Melvin J. Friedman and The Progressive for No. 65 (Copyright © 1961, The Progressive, Inc., reprinted by permission); John Gross for No. 66; Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Inc., and Diana Trilling for No. 40, which first appeared in Partisan Review, reprinted from Speaking of Literature and Society by Lionel Trilling (Copyright © 1980 by Diana and Lionel Trilling. Reprinted by permission); Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc., for No. 52, from On Native Grounds (Copyright 1942, 1970 by Alfred Kazin, reprinted by permission); I.H.T. Corporation for Nos 11, 17, 24, 33, 45, 53, and 63 (© I.H.T. Corporation. Reprinted by permission); Alfred Kazin for No. 54; Louisiana State University Press for No. 43; the Nation

-xiii-

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John Donne: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • General Editor’s Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Three Soldiers 32
  • One Man’s Initiation—1917 59
  • Manhattan Transfer 64
  • The 42nd Parallel 79
  • 1919 99
  • The Big Money 121
  • Adventures of a Young Man 191
  • Number One 236
  • The Grand Design 242
  • Chosen Country 252
  • Midcentury 259
  • Century’s Ebb 276
  • Select Bibliography 283
  • Index 286
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