John Donne: The Critical Heritage

By Barry Maine | Go to book overview

MIDCENTURY

January 1961

60.

Fanny Butcher, ‘Labor Abuses’, Chicago Sunday Tribune Review of Books

26 February 1961, 1

Midcentury undoubtedly will be one of the most talked about books of our day. It will have its passionate detractors as well as its enthusiastic praisers, both for the same reason: its forthright expose of the presence of racketeers in the labor movement and of the dissatisfaction among the ‘rank and file’ in labor.

The author quotes letters received by members of Congress and by newspapers asking such questions as: ‘Is it freedom when a man cannot work at a job without paying a union for the benefit of doing so? Is it freedom when a man cannot work when the union says “strike”? Is it freedom when our streets are blocked, cars overturned, windows broken, buildings and homes blown up by gangs of hoodlums who call themselves pickets?… Is the right to vote any more sacred than the right to work?’

Nobody today will read Midcentury without being disturbed from complacency about the state of the nation and his own state of mind, heart, and soul.

Midcentury is essentially a novel about labor, but it is also about our country, today and only yesterday, a novel so interspersed with fact that the book seems less a story than history. The technique which Dos Passos chooses is the same he used in his great trilogy of the 1920s and 30s, published under the general title, U.S.A. It is a kaleidoscopic series of actual headlines, excerpts from advertisements and letters, short biographies of actual persons and the stories of persons who, if not real, have, in Dos Passos’ pages, the forceful impact of reality.

There is no flowing continuity either to the fictional life stories or to the over-all narrative except in the brief biographies of real men

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Donne: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • General Editor’s Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Three Soldiers 32
  • One Man’s Initiation—1917 59
  • Manhattan Transfer 64
  • The 42nd Parallel 79
  • 1919 99
  • The Big Money 121
  • Adventures of a Young Man 191
  • Number One 236
  • The Grand Design 242
  • Chosen Country 252
  • Midcentury 259
  • Century’s Ebb 276
  • Select Bibliography 283
  • Index 286
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.