Knut Wicksell: Selected Essays in Economics - Vol. 2

By Knut Wicksell; Bo Sandelin | Go to book overview

32

GEORG FRIEDRICH KNAPP, DIE ST A AT LIC HE THEORIE DES GELDES {THE STATE THEORY OF MONEY}

Leipzig, Duncker & Humblot, 1905

A little over a year ago, Professor G.F. Knapp of Strasburg, known as the author of an epoch-making work on the liberation of the peasants in Prussia, and one of the pillars of the German Historical School, surprised the world of economics with a work on the monetary system that in the strictest sense of the word is abstract and theoretical in nature: Die staatliche Theorie des Geldes {The State Theory of Money}. To be sure, there was reason to suspect that he was very well equipped for this kind of writing too, since he is known to have written perceptive studies in mathematical statistics in younger years, which were highly regarded by specialists in the field. However, in the lengthy interim, in conformity with most adherents of the Historical School, Knapp had virtually renounced all theory on principle; that he has now taken so bold a leap into the field of deduction and constructive logic is therefore undeniably a surprise, but, at least for the present writer, a welcome surprise. At the time of writing, Knapp’s work has already been the subject of lengthy and thorough reviews in all the German specialist journals and several foreign ones, and has been criticized or praised all according to the reviewer’s own theoretical standpoint. However, one thing one hardly receives any idea of from all these profoundly serious sequels pro and con is the incomparable stylistic appeal of Knapp’s descriptive art, his masterly didactic exposition, his pleasantly expansive, half solemn, half ironic discourse, spiced throughout with those quiet little satirical sallies that are peculiar to Knapp, and that have doubtless awakened many a happy memory of his unsurpassed lecturing style among his numerous disciples, who by now are spread over the entire globe. One has to have heard and seen Knapp in action to be able fully to appreciate a passage like this (p. 40), referring to those people who because

Originally published in Ekonomisk Tidskrift, 1907.

-210-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Knut Wicksell: Selected Essays in Economics - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.