The Study of Primary Education: A Source Book - Vol. 4

By Marion Dadds; Brenda Lofthouse | Go to book overview

Introduction:

Classroom and Teaching Studies

The study of primary education has been given an added dimension in recent years by empirical work focusing on schools, on classrooms and, in particular, on pedagogy—the complex of teaching approaches, skills, strategies, tactics and forms of organization through which the curriculum is transacted by teachers and children. Such studies are in their infancy, and though their pay-off in terms of increasing the effectiveness of work in primary classrooms cannot be demonstrated, they have been useful in helping to dispel some of the myths surrounding primary practice and in raising important questions for teachers and teacher trainers alike. Their contribution has been more a form of consciousness-raising than the provision of definitive answers to questions of appropriate organization and technique.

Selections from some of the larger scale statistical studies represented in parts one and two of this volume attempt to illustrate the major themes on classroom research which have emerged since Neville Bennett’s contentious work on teaching styles and pupil progress in 1976. These include studies of teaching styles and pupil learning; studies of the way in which teachers match tasks to children; the time children spend on different tasks and how this relates to achievement; the relationship between quality of learning experience and quantity of time on task; and, more recently, in the work of Peter Mortimore and his colleagues, factors at school and classroom level which seem to have a bearing on children’s progress through school. The latter has generated a new interest in developing the concept of school and classroom effectiveness, in which children’s progress, not just attainment, has become a key criterion. Selections from smaller scale, qualitative studies, contribute to some of these themes.

In addition to these major research projects there has been a richness and diversity of smaller scale studies. They have contributed significantly to our understanding of other important classroom issues. The work of Charles Desforges and Ann Cockburn, for example, takes a much needed look at the problems presented to teachers by information processing and decision-making in the modern primary classroom. A number of contributors ask

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Study of Primary Education: A Source Book - Vol. 4
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • General Introduction xi
  • Compilers’ Notes xiii
  • Acknowledgments xiv
  • Introduction: 1
  • 1 - Teachers and Teaching 5
  • Notes 22
  • References 46
  • 2 - Children and Learning 57
  • Reference 60
  • References 76
  • References 98
  • References 140
  • 3 - Teachers as Researchers 155
  • Reference 191
  • Reference 205
  • Index 209
  • The Study of Primary Education—a Source Book: 215
  • Volume 1: Perspectives 216
  • Volume 2: the Curriculum 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.