The Shade of Swords: Jihad and the Conflict between Islam and Christianity

By M. J. Akbar | Go to book overview

THUMBNAIL SKETCHES

Muslim names pose a problem for those used to the alphabetical order of English usage. We have used an arbitrary convenience by taking the first name as the starting point for everyone.

A.K. Fazlul Haq:

A fiery Bengal Muslim leader of the Indian independence movement, who organised the peasantry and later joined the Muslim League. He was one of those who drafted the Pakistan resolution at Lahore.

Abd al-Muttalib ibn Hisham:

Abdullah’s father, the Prophet Muhammad’s grandfather.

Abdallah bin al-Zubayr:

Rebel who seized the Holy Cities after the death of Muawiya.

Abdul Ghani:

First Nawab of Dhaka, given the title in 1875.

Abdul Qadir:

Leader of the Algerian Jihad against the French; with the support of the ulema and villagers went to war with the French, was defeated and exiled in 1847 to Damascus.

Abdul Rahman ibn Abdullah al-Ghafiki:

The great emir or wali of Andalusia (Muslim Spain) whose victorious march was finally stopped at the battle of Tours in 732.

Abdul Uzza (nicknamed Abu Lahb):

The Prophet’s uncle, who conspired against his life.

Abdullah Azam:

Osama bin Laden’s friend and perhaps mentor who set up the Makhtab al Khidmat, or Centre for Service; from here originated the network that became the Al Qaida.

Abdullah ibn Saud:

Founder of the Saudi dynasty.

Abdullah ibn Ubayy:

Leader of Hypocrites, of the Khazarite clan of Awf in Medina, who conspired against the Prophet.

Abdullah:

Prophet Muhammad’s father.

Abdur Rahim:

The Indian theologian Shah Waliullah’s father, Mughal court

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The Shade of Swords: Jihad and the Conflict between Islam and Christianity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • 1 - Chapter and Verse 1
  • 2 - The Joys of Death: a Bargain with Allah 12
  • 3 - Rebellions in the Dark of the Night 26
  • 4 - A Map of Islam 40
  • 5 - Circle of Hell 52
  • 6 - Allah! Muhammad! Saladin! 67
  • 7 - The Doors of Europe 83
  • 8 - Jihad in the East: a Crescent Over Delhi 99
  • 9 - The Holy Sea: Pepper and Power 113
  • 10 - The Bargain Goes Sour 131
  • 11 - The Wedge and the Gate 145
  • 12 - History as Anger, Jihad as Non-Violence 160
  • 13 - Islam in Danger Zone 177
  • 14 - Jinnah Redux and the Age of Osama 189
  • Glossary 214
  • A Suggested Reading List 218
  • Thumbnail Sketches 228
  • Index 251
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