White Supremacy in Children's Literature: Characterizations of African Americans, 1830-1900

By Donnarae MacCann | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
I.A. Newby, Jim Crow’s Defense: Anti-Negro Thought in America, 1900-1930. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1965), 7.
2.
Philadelphia Inquirer, quoted in promotional material about The Sailor Boy; Portland Press, quoted in promotional material about The Soldier Boy.
3.
Millinocket, “Assault on Fort Wagner,” Oliver Optic’s Magazine: (Our Boys and Girls) 5 (January-June 1869): 392; rpt. Oliver Optic’s Companion (Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1872).
4.
Millinocket, “The Brave Little Bugler,” Oliver Optic’s Magazine: (Our Boys and Girls) 5 (January-June 1869): 103.
5.
Charles Sumner, “The United Republic,” Oliver Optic’s Magazine: (Our Boys and Girls) 5 (January-June 1869): 44; rpt. Oliver Optic’s Companion (Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1872).
6.
Willie Wisp, “The Basket-Makers of Bongoloo,” Oliver Optic’s Magazine: (Our Boys and Girls) 5 (January-June 1869): 199; rpt. Oliver Optic’s Companion (Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1872).
7.
Sam Pickering, “A Boy’s Own War,” New England Quarterly 48 (September 1975):371.
8.
Dolores Blythe Jones, comp., An Annotated Catalog-Index to the Series, Nonseries Stories, and Magazine Publications of William Taylor Adams. (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1985), xvi.
9.
Ibid., xiii.
10.
Ibid., xiv.
11.
Gene Gleason, “Whatever Happened to Oliver Optic?” Wilson Library Bulletin 49 (May 1975):650.
12.
American Writers for Children Before 1900, vol. 42, Dictionary of Literary Biography, s.v. “Louise-Clarke Pyrnelle.”
13.
Louise-Clarke Pyrnelle, Diddie, Dumps, and Tot, or Plantation Child-Life (New York: Harper, 1882), 139.
14.
Ibid., v-vi.
15.
Ibid., 240.
16.
Miller, 311.
17.
American Writers for Children, s.v. “Martha Finley (Martha Farquharson).”
18.
Ibid.
19.
Janet E. Brown, “The Saga of Elsie Dinsmore: A study in Nineteenth-Century Sensibility,” University of Buffalo Studies 17:3 (July 1945):80.
20.
Stanley Kunitz and Howard Haycraft, American Authors, 1600-1900 (New York: H.W. Wilson, 1938), 272.
21.
Smedman, 179.
22.
For a fuller statement of Elsie’s repulsiveness, see the quotation from Leslie McFarlane’s The Ghost of the Hardy Boys quoted in Jacqueline Jackson and Philip Kendall, “What Makes a Bad Book Good: Elsie Dinsmore” Children’s Literature 7 (1978): 66. McFarlane writes: “…in the Himalayas of junk turned out by writers of juvenile fiction the Elsie Books stand like Everest as the worst ever written by anybody, and…Elsie Dinsmore is without peer the Most Nauseating Heroine of all time.”
23.
Brown, 123.
24.
Ibid., 127.
25.
Peter A. Soderbergh, “Edward Stratemeyer and the Juvenile Ethic, 1894-1930,” International Review of History and Political Science 11:1 (February 1974):62.
26.
Quoted in Soderbergh, 61 (see n. 23).
27.
“For It Was Indeed He,” (by staff writers of Fortune Magazine) Fortune Magazine 9 (April 1934); rpt. Only Connect: Readings on Children’s Literature, ed. Sheila Egoff, et al. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1969), 53.
28.
Ken Donelson, “Nancy, Tom and Assorted Friends in the Stratemeyer Syndicate Then and Now,” Children’s Literature 7 (1978):18.

-182-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White Supremacy in Children's Literature: Characterizations of African Americans, 1830-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • A Note on Usage xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Notes xxxii
  • Part One - The Antebellum Years 1
  • Chapter One - Ambivalent Abolitionism 3
  • Chapter Two - Sociopolitical and Artistic Dimensions of Abolitionist Tales 25
  • Chapter Three - Personal and Institutional Dimensions 47
  • Part Two - The Postbellum Years 81
  • Chapter Four - Children’s Fiction 83
  • Notes 118
  • Chapter Five - The Social/Political Context 123
  • Chapter Six - Literary Lives 155
  • Notes 182
  • Chapter Seven - Postwar Institutions 185
  • Chapter Eight - Literary Methods and Conventions 211
  • Chapter Nine - Conclusion 233
  • Bibliography 243
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.