Death and Philosophy

By Jeff Malpas; Robert C. Solomon | Go to book overview

INDEX

a
Absolute 111
absurdity 2 , 113
account, Kantian sense of 136
Achilles 172
action 114-16 , 124 , 127 , 128 , 191
aesthetics, closure as basic principle of 40-43
after-death experience 71-78 , 185
afterlife 45 , 50 , 52-53 , 54 , 61 , 158 , 159 , 173 , 174 , 183
ageing 39-40 , 43-44 , 142-43 , 150
agency 123 , 124 , 125 , 128 , 193
Akira Kurosawa 186
Alexander the Great 160 , 170
Allen, Woody 156
Americans 156-57 , 163
analytic philosophy 2 , 169 , 196
anatman (no-self) 90
ancestor worship 60
anima mundi86
animal, as distinct from human existence 86 , 94-95 , 120-21 , 192-93
animals, and death 134 , 171 , 196 , 197
anti-Cartesianism 114
antiques 44 , 194
anticipation 116-17 , 119
‘anticipatory resoluteness’ 108
antinomy, of death 135-51
anxiety (Angst)88 , 92 , 93 , 95 , 96 , 99-103 , 106-9 , 113 , 115 , 138 , 196-97
Appiah, Anthony 46
Aquinas, St Thomas 174
archetypes 78 , 80
Aristotle 42 , 152 , 173 , 174 , 180
arris 40
ars moriendi18
art:
Aristotle on 42 ;
of dying 18 ;
pointillist 12
artificial intelligence 140
ataraxia167
attitudes 122 , 123 , 124-25
atomism 35 , 165
Augenblick (‘moment of vision’) 95 , 114
authenticity 98-99 , 104 , 109 , 112-19 ;
and death 98-99 , 104 , 112-19 ;
see inauthenticity 98
automobile 163
autonomy 107-9 , 116 , 118
axiology 136 , 148
axiological objectivism 136

b
‘bald scenario’ 50-51 , 55 , 166
bardo (realm of transition after death) 71 , 72 , 74 , 75 , 80 , 82 , 184
Bardo Thödol (Tibetan Book for the Dead)71-82 , 184 , 185
Bashō 93
Basquiat, Jean-Michel 161 , 162
Becker, Ernest 22 , 156
Being 87 , 98 , 102-11 , 115 , 134 , 189 , 190 ;
and nothingness 102-11 , 134 ;
as finite 111 ;
of beings 102 , 105 , 108 , 110 , 189 , 190 ;
meaning of 98 ;
mystery of 106 ;
of Dasein99 , 100 , 103 , 104 ;
truth of 105 ;
voice of 104
beings:
and Being 99-110 ;
ground of 101 , 102 , 103 , 106 , 107 , 110 ;
Being of 102 , 105 , 108 , 110 , 189 , 190
being-in-the-world 99 , 113 , 125
being-towards-death 48 , 94 , 98-99 , 101 , 104 , 114 , 161 , 164 , 171 , 175 , 176 , 197
‘being-towards-taxes’ 195
being-with-others 113 , 176

-203-

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Death and Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Death and Philosophy 1
  • 2 - My Death 5
  • 3 - Against Death 16
  • 4 - On the Purported Insignificance of Death 22
  • 5 - Death and the Skeleton 39
  • 6 - Death, the Bald Scenario 50
  • 7 - Death as Transformation in Classical Daoism 57
  • 8 - Death and Enlightenment 71
  • 9 - Death and Detachment 83
  • 10 - Death and Metaphysics 98
  • 11 - Death and Authenticity 112
  • 12 - Death and the Unity of a Life 120
  • 13 - The Antinomy of Death 135
  • 14 - Death Fetishism, Morbid Solipsism 152
  • Notes 177
  • References 198
  • Index 203
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