whose physical reality is enacted only through acts of collective remembering.

The notion of place, and one’s positioning within it, remains highly topical in light of colonial deeds and post-colonial discourses. Recent newspaper articles strikingly reflect and illustrate the importance of emplacement and dislocation in postmodern popular contexts. On 19 June 1997, The Times in Britain published a full-page advertisement with the title ‘First Their Children Were Stolen… Now Their Land Too? An Open Letter to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II Queen of Australia’. This plea, appearing at the initiative of various human rights organisations and urging for the restoration of land to Australian aboriginal populations, emphasised the obvious political and economic empowerment associated with rights of access to territory, but also underlined the ‘exceptional spiritual and cultural importance’ of land in sustaining Aboriginals’ identity. Access to sacred sites and culturally significant landmarks were deemed essential preconditions to the establishment of an economically thriving community. In this sense, the centrality of cosmological origin precedes and conditions actual territoriality, spiritual well-being and material survival. Other recent media expressions of interest in the manifestation of sentiments of locality have included features on paganism in Britain, where more than 100,000 people are now estimated officially to belong to spiritual groups including druidry, shamanism, witch covens and other such groups where the sacredness of nature is emphasised. Importantly, nature appears explicitly to be used in this industrialised and postmodern context in order to ‘give us a sense of belonging. It takes away our alienation 1 from our land and our community. It finds a sanctity with the natural world and a deep connection with the earth’ (druidess quoted in the Guardian, Friday 20 June 1997).

Yet if belonging and territoriality can be thus linked in life, their power of attraction also extends beyond the boundaries of death. In the course of this year, Che Guevara has finally regained his original home, to be buried there after more than thirty years in mortuary exile, while the remains of Long Wolf—a prominent Sioux chief who died in London while on a Buffalo Bill Wild West tour—have recently been reburied close to Wounded Knee after their exhumation from Brompton Park cemetery. Relatives and friends spoke of Long Wolf’s longing to return home. These two accounts featured in articles rather evocatively entitled ‘Che comes Home as Cuba’s King of Kitsch’, a reference to his embodiment of contemporary political ideals in Castro’s Cuba (Observer, Sunday 12 October 1997), and ‘Chief Returns to his Beloved Black Hills’ (The Times, Friday 26 September 1997). Home is emphasised as a

-2-

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