Pascal: The Emergence of Genius

By Emile Cailliet | Go to book overview

XV
A Lamp Unto My Feet

"Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path."

-- Ps.119:105*

It is written...and it is written.... And this is why Jesus Christ, who said...also said...But he did not say..." Pascal's thinking in his latter years might well have been summarized in these five Scriptural propositions, based upon five Biblical texts,1 forming a solid framework of eight lines in Fragment 949 of the Pensées.2 Alike in his life and in his work, the Bible came to hold such an important place for Pascal that, if we wish to establish the chronology of some undated writings of his on a moral or spiritual theme, the surest criterion would be to rely upon the number and character of Biblical quotations or allusions found therein. Whether he was summarizing his position during a controversy, or establishing the proper ground for some personal maxim, or giving counsel as a Christian layman, Pascal came to rely more and more upon the Bible.


BIBLICAL RADICALISM

"Anyone who seeks to give meaning to Scripture, without taking it directly from Scripture, is a foe to Scripture." This principle indicates clearly enough the Biblical radicalism of one who had heard Christ Himself say to him: "I am present with thee by My Word in Scripture."3

For Pascal, "all depends upon the blessing of God, to be attributed only to things done for Him, according to His rules and His ways, the manner being thus as important as the thing itself, and perhaps more."4 To hold fast to Scripture interpreted according to Scripture, was to

____________________
*
Psalm 119, numbered 118 in the Douay Bible, was Pascal's favorite.
1
Eccl. 3:8; Ps. 116:2; John 12:34; John 14:27; Matt. 10:34.
2
Pensées, Section xiv, Fr. 949, Œuvres, v. 14, 383.
3
Le Mystère de Jésus, Pensées, Section vii, Fr. 553, Œuvres, v. 13, 438.
4
Pensées, Section vii, Fr. 499, Œuvres, v. 13, 399, 400.

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pascal: The Emergence of Genius
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Introduction to the Torchbook Edition 6
  • Preface to the Torchbook Edition 14
  • I - The Emergence of a Pilgrim 17
  • II - An Open Mind in the Making 39
  • III - The Jansenist Quickening 53
  • IV - The Physicist Confronting His Bible 67
  • V - The Source of Our Unhappiness 85
  • VI - Pascal's Hour of Agony 111
  • VII - Fire in the Night 131
  • VIII - Glimpse of a Sanctuary 149
  • IX - The New Vista 167
  • X - Not Peace, but a Sword 187
  • XI - The Champion 207
  • XII - The Sign in the Midst of Battle 223
  • XIII - The Dictates of Conscience 243
  • XIV - Fighting a New Inquisition 267
  • XV - A Lamp Unto My Feet 289
  • XVI - Running the Way of the Lord 311
  • XVII - Holy Anxiety 339
  • XVIII - Meditation on a Death Mask 361
  • Appendix to the Torchbook Edition: Recent Research 364
  • Index 375
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 383

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.